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Calls for Abstracts and Submissions

Following are open Calls for Papers or Submissions this month:

Journals

Call for Papers: Special Issue of Monash Bioethics Review on “Moral Duties to Novel Beings.” Guest Edited by: Julian Koplin (University of Melbourne); Christopher Gyngell (Murdoch Children’s Research Institute)

Scientific advances are making it possible to create new kinds of beings. Organisms that contain both human and animal cells (human-animal chimeras) have been created to model human disease, and might be used in the future to generate human organs for transplant. Human brain organoids (which resemble miniature in vitro human brains) are now used to study brain development and neurodegenerative disorders. Genome editing has been used to create monkeys with ‘humanised’ brains, revealing new insights into the genetics of human cognition. Synthetic embryos formed from stem cells are being used to study early human development. The brains of dead animals have been partially “revived” hours after the animal was slaughtered, potentially paving the way for brain resuscitation in humans. These strands of research are helping further scientific discovery, but they also pose imminent ethical questions. For example: Does a synthetic embryo that is functionally equivalent to a human embryo have the same moral status? How complex does a brain organoid need to become before we have moral obligations toward it? How does ‘humanising’ a monkey’s brain affect its moral standing? This Special Issue of Monash Bioethics Review aims to investigate these and other questions raised by the creation of novel kinds of beings. Submission Deadline:  December 31. This Special Issue is planned for publication in the second half of 2020. Individual articles will be processed for advanced publication immediately upon acceptance. We are seeking papers between 4,000 and 10,000 words. When submitting online (via the journal website below), please be sure to indicate that your submission is intended for this Special Issue on Moral Duties to Novel Beings. For additional submission and formatting requirements, please see Instructions for Authors available via the Monash Bioethics Review website:https://www.springer.com/philosophy/ethics+and+moral+philosophy/journal/40592. If you have any questions or wish to discuss proposals and/or abstracts, please write to koplinj@unimelb.edu.au.

The Journal of Sustainable Tourism is accepting submissions for a special issue on wildlife and tourism. This special issue will include theoretical and empirical papers exploring the impacts of tourism on wildlife. Manuscripts within the special issue will critically evaluate especially the impacts – positive and negative – of current forms and practices of wildlife tourism on the conservation status of wild species, and on the welfare of individual animals. It will establish correlates of good and bad outcomes in both captive and wild settings. The issue will also address tourists’ values and responsibilities, with respect to wildlife tourism, as well as the responsibilities and duties of institutions that act as gatekeepers to wildlife tourism experiences – including the provision of information on impacts to customers and ensuring distribution of benefits among local stakeholders and wildlife. The deadline for submissions is October 1. Find out more here: https://think.taylorandfrancis.com/tourism-and-wildlife/?utm_source=CPB_think&utm_medium=cms&utm_campaign=JOF10025

The interdisciplinary journal Animals invites submissions to a special issue on the following topic: Animal Ethics: Questioning the Orthodoxy. Guest editors: Herwig Grimm and Susana Monsó (Messerli Research Institute Vienna). Deadline for submissions: September 30. It has become commonplace to refer to the success of animal ethics and the animal turn in philosophy. Since Singer and Regan published their ground-breaking works more than forty years ago, animal ethics has become an institutionalised field of research. This is mirrored in the appearance of entire journals, book series, text books, BA, MA and PhD programmes, conferences, research institutes, etc. devoted to it. To use a metaphor, animal ethics is no longer a toddler, but a teenager, full of energy, beginning to question its heritage and its future. This Special Issue aims to channel this rebellious spirit in order to help lay down the foundations for a prosperous adulthood. Therefore, we invite submissions that call into question the orthodoxy in animal ethics.

In particular, we aim to collect a series of papers that question:

  • Classical premises: papers that address key terms and claims that were previously taken for granted, such as speciesism, the dichotomy moral agents/patients, the inherent disvalue of animal pain and suffering, the is/ought gap, etc.
  • Classical theories and methodologies: papers that bring innovations into animal ethics by applying methodologies that until recently were often neglected, such as phenomenology, pragmatism, feminism, interdisciplinary and empirically-informed approaches, etc.
  • Classical topics: papers that pick up topics that were ignored or under-treated in the canonical texts, such as human interventions in nature, the predator–prey problem, companion animals, cognitive enhancement and disenhancement of animals, representation of animals, duties towards invertebrates, meaning in the lives of animals, etc.

We welcome submissions addressing these and further relevant topics. With this Special Issue, we aim to deliver an overview of new solutions to canonical problems and new problems that were previously unseen. We expect to map out new directions in the field of animal ethics and contribute to clarifying the self-understanding of the discipline. Please kindly note that for submissions to this special issue there is a word limit of 8,000 words (references not included). Further information can be found in this link. Informal inquiries can be sent to: susana.monso@vetmeduni.ac.at

The editors are organizing a Special Issue on the psycho-social impact of human-animal interactions (HAIs) on health in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. The study of HAI has received an enormous amount of multidisciplinary interest over the past few decades, including research on therapy and service animals. Our relationships with nonhuman animals is now being examined in more depth to understand the physiological and psycho-social benefits of these interactions throughout the lifespan. Additional attention has been given to investigating the role of animals in supporting the lives of vulnerable populations, including the elderly and persons with disabilities. This Special Issue, guest edited by Aubrey Fine, is open to any subject area related to the psycho-social benefits of human-animal interactions. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities. Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website. Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI. Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI’s English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions. Deadline for manuscript submissions: September 30.

Conferences

‘Movements’ will be held at the University of Leeds on 22 and 23 November, under the direction of Lourdes Orozco, Jonathan Saha and Tom Tyler. If you are interested in giving a paper addressing the topic ‘Movements’ from whatever disciplinary perspective please submit your title, with an abstract of no more than 200 words and a brief biography (also of no more than 200 words). These should be included within your email – i.e. not as attachments. Please send them to j.saha@leeds.ac.uk. The deadline for abstracts is  July 30. Presentations will be 20 minutes long and we hope to include work by individuals at different career stages. Sadly we have no money to support travel, accommodation or attendance costs.

Topics covered at this meeting might include (but are not limited to):
•       Animal migrations
•       Bodily motility
•       Animals as conveyances
•       Trafficking
•       Performance and performativity

We would welcome papers that deal with such issues in contemporary and historical settings, and would especially like to see papers that address these issues from contexts outside the UK, including the Global South. Papers are welcomed from across animal studies, including disciplines such as (but not limited to) geography, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, art history, classical studies, history, science and technology studies, ethology, philosophy, psychology, behavioural sciences and ecology. Find out more here: http://www.britishanimalstudiesnetwork.org.uk/FutureMeetings/Movements.aspx

 

Romance and the Animal Turn, at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies (2020)

The animal turn has become hugely influential in medieval scholarship over the last decade. However, the contributions of ecofeminism and queer ecology have often been side-lined. Nevertheless, scholars are increasingly finding these modes of analysis to offer useful ways of exploring the role of the animal in medieval romance texts. The Medieval Romance Society is hosting three sessions on romance and the animal turn at the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies 2020, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo. All papers must be presented in English; however, we welcome submissions on romances from any region in the Middle Ages. We invite papers that respond to ecofeminist and queer ecological literary criticism; papers that respond to posthumanist and related philosophical theories; and papers which do not take a theoretical approach.

Session I: Romance and the Animal Turn I: Romance and Ecofeminism: This session welcomes papers looking at representations of gender, masculinity and/or femininity in relation to animals and nature in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the horse in chivalric masculinity, animal foster-mothers for human children, or gendered discourses of meat-eating. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary ecofeminist theory, although this is not required.

Session II: Romance and the Animal Turn II: Romance and Queer Ecology: This session invites papers looking at representations of sex and sexuality and/or queer identity in relation to discourses of animals and nature in romance texts. Papers might explore the role of animals in the construction of heteronormative ideologies, queer animals in romance narratives, and species panic. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary theories of queer ecology, although this is not required.

Session III: Romance and the Animal Turn III: Romance and Posthumanism: This session welcomes papers that explore discourses of human and animal identity in romance texts. Example topics could include: the role of the animal in ideologies of race, interspecies hybridity, and animal subjectivity in romance. We particularly encourage papers that respond to contemporary posthumanist theory, although this is not required.

Please send abstracts of up to 300 words to Tim Wingard (tw659@york.ac.uk) by September 1. For more info, visit: medievalromanceanimal.wordpress.com

 American Comparative Literature Association conference, March 19-22, Chicago: Nature and Morality: (Non)Human Sexuality in Science and Literature

in the history and philosophy of science has focused on the moral authority of nature (Against Nature, Lorraine Daston, 2019; The Moral Authority of Nature, eds. Loraine Daston & Fernando Vidal, 2003),
while feminist and queer studies have explored the relationship between sex(uality) and nature (The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America, Greta LaFleur, 2018; Anthropocene Feminism, ed.
Richard Grusin, 2017; Queer Ecology, eds. Catriona Sandilands & Bruce Erickson, 2010; Nature’s Body: Gender in the Making of Modern Science, Londa Schiebinger, 2003). In this seminar, we aim to bring together these separate discussions to investigate the ways in which literature explores concepts of sexual morality with reference to the natural and (non)human world. Is nature the model for perfect morality? Is it an abject and taboo force that needs to be tamed by human intervention? Or can we ‘queer’ thinking about moral natures by finding different ways for sexual morality to relate to nature and the non-human world? We are particularly interested in exploring how different parts of nature – non-humans animals, plants, minerals, elements like water – are mobilized to inform concepts of sexual morality. This seminar also inquires how reference to morality and nature highlights the intersections of sex, gender and sexuality with race, whiteness, and indigeneity. In order to answer these questions and prompts, this seminar aims to bring together papers focusing on different literary traditions across historical periods. Interested participants are welcome to email the seminar co-organizers Joela Jacobs (joelajacobs@email.arizona.edu), Ina Linge (K.Linge@exeter.ac.uk), and Katharine Mershon (mershok@whitman.edu) with questions. All participants will need to submit their abstracts to the ACLA website (http://www.acla.org/annual-meeting) between August 31 and September 23. See the seminar and more conference information
here: https://www.acla.org/nature-and-morality-nonhuman-sexuality-science-and-literature

 RETHINKING CANID-HUMAN RELATIONS, BROCK UNIVERSITY, NOVEMBER 21-22.

Our relations with canids are particularly intense: we welcome some into our homes as family members but others are regarded as demonic creatures to be exterminated. What do these relations tell us about ourselves and our societies? What do our relations with canids mean for our relations with other animals? What efforts are being made to protect canids from exploitation? This conference focuses on wild and domesticated canids and their relationships and interactions with humans but we encourage contributions that consider implications for human relations with other animals generally.

Papers are welcomed on topics such as the following:

  • historical & contemporary relations with canids;
  • canids, commodification, capitalism;
  • canid behaviour, cognition, emotions;
  • canids in art & culture; representation;
  • canid conservation;
  • canids in captivity; zoos;
  • pet-keeping; breeding;
  • canid companions, housing, family
  • fighting, racing, other forms of exploitation;
  • abuse, cruelty, neglect, violence & law;
  • rescue & sanctuary;
  • community/street dogs;
  • use of canids for food, fur, laboratory tools;
  • use of dogs as service & therapeutic tools;
  • cultural imperialism, postcolonialism, decolonization & canids.

We encourage papers that take a critical perspective and consider trans-species social justice. Registration is free, the conference is open to all. Please submit a 250 word abstract to animalconference@brocku.ca by September 30.

Institut für Christliche Philosophie: Thinking Species, An Austro-Canadian Animal and Media Ethics Workshop. Innsbruck, December 6

Once a year scholars and academics from Canada and Europe meet in Innsbruck to discuss topics of Applied Ethics. This year’s subject will be the question of how the representation of non-human animals impacts the way we think of them and, consequently, treat them. Contributions should focus on the possibilities of representing the various species in the media, on the consequences of these representations with regard to different concepts of the human-animal-relationship or on what these observations have to do with ethics. The conference language is English. To leave time for discussion, the papers presented should not exceed 20 minutes. Participation is free. Travel costs cannot be covered. Submission of abstracts (300 words, until August 31): claudia.paganini@uibk.ac.at

Books

The Animals & Society Institute and the editors of the Brill Academic Human-Animal Studies Book Series invite scholars to submit book proposals for consideration for publication in the series. The purview of the book series includes any topic that allows exploration of the relation between human and nonhuman animals in any setting, contemporary or historical, from the perspective of various disciplines within both the social sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, anthropology, political science) and humanities (e.g., history, literary criticism). Among the broad areas included are: 1. applied uses of animals (research, education, medicine, agriculture), 2. animals in the popular culture (entertainment, companion animals, animal symbolism), 3. wildlife and the environment, 4. socio-political movements, public policy and the law. To date, 22 titles have been published. Proposals should include table of contents, introductory and one other chapter, supporting letter providing information about audience, need, competing titles. Pre-proposal inquiries are welcome. Send queries to Kenneth Shapiro, editor, ken.shapiro@animalsandsociety.org.

CALL FOR BOOK CHAPTERS for the volume Denialism in Environmental and Animal Abuse: Averting Our Gaze, in the Lexington Books series: Environment and Society (series ed. Douglas Vakoch).

Editors:

  • Dr. Tomaž Grušovnik (Faculty of Education, University of Primorska, Slovenia)
  • Dr. Karen Lykke Syse (Centre for Development and the Environment, University of Oslo,
    Norway)
  • Dr. Reingard Spannring (Institute for Educational Studies, University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Despite readily available facts and figures regarding human-caused natural degradation and often overwhelming scientific consensus on issues related to environmental pollution, we are still faced with the disbelief about the existence and extent of anthropogenic impact on the environment. The failure of the so-called Information Deficit Model, according to which public inaction and apathy are generally attributable to lack of relevant information, prompted natural and socials sciences as well as humanities to look for alternative accounts of passivity and inertia in the field of environmental education and awareness-raising. Thus, in the last two decades researchers increasingly focused on the concept of “denialism” as the more suitable explanation of the lack of significant environmental change. Several fields contributed to our understanding of the phenomenon, including anthropology, social psychology, philosophy, sociology, linguistics, ecocriticism, natural science and science communication. The proposed edited volume thus seeks to provide a clear and comprehensive contribution to our understanding of the “environmental denial” with chapters from researchers in natural and social sciences as well as humanities, disclosing the multifaceted appearance of the concept by approaching it from different perspectives.

In somewhat similar fashion to environmental disciplines, animal ethics, critical animal studies, and related fields also stumbled on an analogous phenomenon when trying to account for our increasing meat consumption and lack of empathy for the animals slaughtered in the industries despite the efforts of educators, activists, and academia to raise the awareness of the harsh realities of “Animal-Industrial Complex.” Indeed, several papers in recent decades have focused on consumers’ cognitive dissonance as the vehicle for ignorance, as well as on the drastic consequences of the denial, including Perpetration-Induced-Traumatic-Stress that occurs in workplaces demanding repeated exposure to violence. As the research shows, more than hundred and fifty billions of animals killed annually by the industries are hardly a
consequence of our ignorance and lack of empathy; to the contrary, withdrawal of compassion for the suffering animals can be seen as a product of socialization into carnistic societies. The edited volume thus also aims to present the reader with recent insights into the denial of animal sentience, subjectivity, and agency in range of contexts, providing opportunity of both denialism debates – environmental as well as animal – to mutually shed light onto each other.

Chapter proposal submissions are invited from researchers and academics on or before September 30. Proposals should not exceed 1000 words, presenting main arguments of the chapter and explaining how they fit into the general theme of the volume. Proposals in Word or PDF formats (Times New Roman, 12, 1.5 spacing) should be sent to tomaz.grusovnik@pef.upr.si and reingard.spannring@uibk.ac.at on or before the specified date together with author’s CVs. Full chapters should be around 6000 words in length, following Lexington “Production Guidelines” (https://rowman.com/Page/PROGUIDE). All chapters will be subject to peer-reviews. Once the chapters have been reviewed, final chapters will have to be submitted within 2 months from the date they are returned to authors. The volume is planned to be published in late 2020 or early 2021. For more information about the project please write to Tomaž Grušovnik and Reingard Spannring to the above addresses.

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