Select Page

Law Schools (T-Z)

Law Schools (T-Z) Overview

This is a list of Law Schools (T-Z) around the world who provide courses for animal sciences in relation to the human-animal relationship.  This includes the name of the college, the name of the course, who is teaching the course, and brief description of the animal science course that the instructor will be covering.

 

Temple University School of Law

Animal Law

Dara Lovitz

This course will examine the philosophical and jurisprudential bases for the current status of animals in our legal system and will discuss the history of, and future trends regarding, that status. Students will explore the various moral, ethical and public policy considerations which are implicated in balancing the interests of human beings and non-human animals. Topics include the treatment of animals as property, including animal custody in divorce; state anti-cruelty laws; the federal Animal Welfare Act; the Endangered Species Act; veterinary malpractice; tort liability for animal-inflicted injury; standing in litigation on behalf of animals; and animal rights advocacy in the age of ecoterrorism legislation.

 

Texas Wesleyan School of Law

Animal Law

Don Feare

This course provides an overview of the changing relationship between society and animals by examining the development of both civil and criminal law as it relates to animals. The course also explores the philosophical issues that drive the law’s evolution and describes the law as an expression of how we share the environment with animals.

 

The John Marshall Law School

Animal Law. This course considers the idea of “animal law” or “animal rights.” Through an examination of statutory, regulatory, case studies, and proposed legislation, this course provides an overview of nonhuman animals and their “legal” status. The course also considers the philosophical and moral underpinnings of nonhuman animal law. This course will address the interplay of environmental and natural resource laws and nonhuman animals. Finally, the course will examine initiatives addressing the legal rights of nonhuman animals on both the national and international fronts.

 

Thomas Jefferson School of Law

Animal Law

Michael Martindill

An overview of the application of regulatory enactments and general principals of Tort, Constitutional, Criminal, Contract, Property and Trust Law to domestic animals and owners, and to wildlife and sportsmen/women and conservationists. The course approach will be to analyze and apply federal, state and municipal statutes as well as reported case law using a traditionally styled casebook (specific to animal law), supplemental material as determined by the professor, and practical discussion of both transactional and litigation aspects of animal law.

 

Thomas M. Cooley Law School

Animal Law

Anna Rose Stern

Considers how legal systems, cases, statutes, and society view and protect the rights of nonhuman animals. Explores how legal concepts such as rights, legal personhood, standing, and property can be used in managing the conflicts involved in various human and nonhuman interactions.

 

Tulane University Law School

Animal Law Seminar

Marilyn David

This seminar will cover the substance and principles of existing law as it addresses nonhuman animals.  This will include animal issues raised in the areas of criminal law, torts, property, constitutional law, contracts, wills and trusts, and various animal-focused federal statutes.  Students will assess the future possibilities of using various legal concepts and tools, such as “rights,” “legal personhood,” and “standing,” to address the relationship of humans to living beings outside the human species.  The seminar will address how cultural traditions affect conceptualization of legal protections and existing rights with which court systems and lawyers must deal regarding animal issues.  The course will be taught by Marilyn H. David who is in private practice, specializing in federal, state, and municipal government contract litigation.

 

University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law

Animal Law

Chris Wencker

This survey course will provide an overview of how the law considers, treats, and interacts with animals, and the humans who deal with them, in a variety of areas. This course will focus on special issues and rules regarding animals in major legal areas, including property, tort, contract, and criminal law.

 

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law School

Animal Law

Philip D. Oliver

Includes such topics as state and federal animal protection laws, factory farming, vivisection, and statutes covering hunting (including interference with hunting). Students, who present their seminar papers in class, have chosen to write on topics ranging from standing to an examination of the link between sadistic treatment of animals and sadistic treatment of people. Offered for the first time in the Spring of 1999.

 

University of Baltimore School of Law

Animal Law Seminar

Alan Nemeth

This course is an in-depth survey of the burgeoning and dynamic field of animal law. Animal welfare, pet trusts, veterinary malpractice, endangered species, First Amendment issues, divorce pet custody disputes, the animal cruelty/violence against humans link, and animal legal standing are but a few of the issues that will be discussed in this course, which also examines other animal law legal issues, including issues involving constitutional law, torts, contracts, wills and trusts. This course will encourage students, in the research papers they are required to write for the course, to creatively analyze existing legal doctrine as well as to craft and analyze new legal approaches evolving in the rapidly developing field of animal law.

 

University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law

Animal Law

Bruce Wagman

This course presents a survey of the historical and current status of this rapidly developing specialty. In brief, animal law encompasses all areas of the law in which the nature ” legal, social or biological” of nonhuman animals is an important factor. It is an objective and logical specialization of a challenging area ” one with a growing number of cases and laws, increasing public and practical interest, and significantly different historical, legal and philosophical foundations than most other courses.

 

University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law

Animals and the Law

Taimie Bryant

The field of animal law has grown tremendously in the past decade. There is substantial litigation and reform legislation designed to help animals we exploit for food, entertainment, and research. There is also considerable activism on behalf of companion animals. This introduction to the field covers such topics as standing to sue on behalf of animals, different theoretical perspectives that drive decisions about when and whom to sue on behalf of animals, and problems of pursuing legislative reform. The course is intended as a basic survey of the general problems in the field. Students may be asked to write brief assignments in addition to the required final examination. The final exam is 2 hours long and is closed book.

 

University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law

Animal Law

Taimie Bryant

This course will examine the legal and sociological aspects of sheltering lost, homeless, and wild animals.  We will consider the reasons animals enter shelters, what happens to them in shelters, and whether they leave or die in shelters.  Important questions include trends in shelter management, whether the structure of private or public shelters matters, and pathways for shelter animal reform.  The grade for the class will be based on short written assignments, class participation, and one closed-book final exam.

 

University of Cincinnati College of Law

Animal Law

Ruth Tkacz

This course addresses legal and philosophical materials relevant to understanding the legal status of animals. The focus is on the status of animals as property, the doctrine of standing, and the nature of legal rights as applied to nonhuman animals. The course incorporates developing tort law concepts, criminal law, and constitutional law, and considers the evolution of the law’s understanding and treatment of animals by examining federal and state statutes and policies.

 

University of Connecticut School of Law, Jane Comerford

Animal Law

Jessica Rubin

This course provides an introduction to the law regulating human interaction with animals, an area of growing practical and conceptual interest. Specific issues considered include: the definition of ‘animal’ in anti-cruelty statutes; tort liability for injuries caused by and to animals; veterinary malpractice; trusts and estates issues arising from efforts to direct disposition of animals; the problem of standing in animal-related litigation; constitutional protections for animal owners and animal protection groups; the nuances of various federal laws including the Animal Welfare Act and the Endangered Species Act; and legal issues surrounding animal experimentation, recent efforts at animal cloning and other advances in genomic and neuroscience.

 

University of Denver College of Law

Civil Rights Seminar: Animal Rights

Patricia Bangert

Students enrolled in this course explore the definition of the term animal, the laws offering some protection of animals. State and federal anti-cruelty laws, such as the Animal Welfare Act and the Endangered Species Act, are used as a basis for in-class discussions debating the need for animal rights.

 

University of Georgia School of Law

Animal Law

Sarah Schindler

This seminar will explore the legal treatment of animals throughout the law.  After an examination of different ethical conceptions about the appropriate treatment of and uses for animals, the course will look at a variety of topics, possibly including: regulatory schemes for wildlife, including hunting regimes and protection of endangered species; regulation of domesticated animals for food, research, and entertainment; regulations of veterinary practices; and the role that animals play in traditional areas of law including property, torts, and criminal law.  Depending on class size, students will be expected to complete either a research paper or exam.

 

University of Houston Law Center

International Environmental Law

Amy Bures Danna

International Environmental Law is a study of basic principles of international law and selected environmental treaties, declarations, and other international law instruments through which the world community is responding to transboundary and global environmental problems. Topics include waste disposal, air pollution and climate change, protection of animal species and loss of biodiversity, and regulation of trade in chemicals.

 

University of Kansas School of Law

Animal Rights Seminar

Michael H. Hoeflich

This seminar addresses a fundamental legal question, i.e. what rights are to be accorded to animals both in nature and in human society? The participants will read and discuss a number of theories of animal rights based upon philosophical, religious, pragmatic, and biological bases and will explore the legal and jurisprudential ramifications of these theories. Students will be required to write a substantial research paper of publishable quality. Students must enroll for both semesters of the academic year for one credit hour per semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

 

University of Maryland School of Law

Environmental Law Seminar: Animal Law

Valerie Stanley

This seminar will examine the federal and state laws governing, and purporting to protect, animals used for experimentation, food, entertainment and sport. The seminar will consider the realities of life and death for such animals. It will examine whether the laws that seek to protect them accomplish their purposes through a review of relevant case law and other materials. The seminar will address the societal, legislative, and judicial mechanisms operating to maintain animals as property. The course will address and discuss standing, a potential problem facing those who seek to litigate on behalf of animals and to protect them. The seminar will discuss the concept of legal rights for animals and it will review proposals for a re-examination of their status as property under law. Students will write a paper examining in depth one of the ways in which animals are used and the relevant laws aimed at protecting them in that area, and developing a litigation strategy to remedy a particular problem facing companion animals, wildlife, animals used in experimentation or raised for food.

 

University of Miami School of Law

Animal Law Workshop

Marcy LaHart

This workshop taught by an animal law practitioner will cover relevant areas of substantive law relating to issues involving non-human animals, with the primary focus on development of practical advocacy skills. Topics addressed will include pet custody, veterinary malpractice and other animal related torts, dangerous dogs, federal, state and local government regulation of animals including the Animal Welfare Act, cruelty to animals, the Florida Puppy Lemon Law, standing to enforce animal protection laws, pets in housing, and pet trusts. This is not an animal rights course or a philosophy course, although questions regarding what rights animals should or do have will likely arise as a natural consequence of the subject matter examined. Course materials will be Animal Law: Cases and Materials, Third Edition, cases and law review articles. Grading will be determined based on class participation (35%), class assignments and presentations (35%), and a 10 page paper/ motion/memorandum (30%) on one of various selected topics.

 

University of Michigan Law School

Animal Law

Nicole Appleberry

This course is an introduction to the expanding law that regulates human treatment of animals. In scientific and medical research, legal limitations on the use of animals are of fundamental importance, intellectual as well as practical: they may limit what can be hoped from the biosciences. Similarly, the nature and extent of protection of animals in food production systems has a large economic importance and large consequence for human welfare and population growth. Internationally, differing treatments of these issues raise questions of free trade. Nationally and internationally, legal approaches to the treatment of undomesticated animals affect critical environmental and biodiversity concerns. The course will focus both on fundamental questions, including whether conceiving of rights for animals is appropriate, and on an understanding of the current legal and administrative devices through which the human relation with animals is regulated.

 

University of Missouri, Kansas City Law School

Animal Law

Dana Apple

This course will begin with a brief overview of the philosophical and cultural issues underlying human/animal relationships, including basic theories of the legal system’s responses to social change. Legal issues relating to food animals, companion animals, laboratory animals, wild animals, and performing animals will be examined with reference to: (1) federal statues (Animal Welfare Act, Endangered Species Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Wild Horses and Burros Act, Animal Damage Control Act, National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act, Refuge Recreation Act, National Environment Police Act, and Humane Slaughter Act); (2) state statues (anti-cruelty, wills and trusts, hunting, racing and fighting statues); (3) local animal control regulations; and (4) extensive common law (standing, rights, free exercise of religion, property, landlord-tenant disputes, torts, marital dissolution and custody, and bailment).

 

University of New Mexico School of Law

Animal Law

Marsha Baum

In this course, we will focus on a series of topics that relate to “animal law.” We will address the extent to which the legal system, specific cases, legislation and background cultural values have affected, and will continue to affect, the ways in which judges, administrators, politicians, lawyers, law students, legal scholars, and lay people see, speak about, and treat animals other than humans. This course will focus on the evolution, interpretation, and enforcement of laws relating to the use and treatment of animals in our society, evaluation of whether, how and why such laws should be modified, and the possible ramifications of such change. The course will cover a wide array of animal law issues, including the legal classification of animals as property, loss of companionship/emotional distress, veterinary malpractice, anti-cruelty laws, constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals, and the development of laws relating to commercial uses of animals.

 

University of New Mexico School of Law

Animal Ecosystems: Urban, Rural and Wild

Marsha Baum

 

University of Ottawa

Law & Society:  Animals and the Law

Daphne Gilbert

This course will examine the legal classification of non-human animals, the laws that govern their treatment, as well as a number of topics that fall within the general headings “animal law” and “animal rights.” Such topics include: the historical and philosophical treatment of animals, and how such treatment has impacted the ways in which people see and speak about animals; how humans interact with and use animals; current animal protection laws; recent political campaigns to reform animal protection laws; the classification of animals as “property” and whether such classification is appropriate or important; and whether current legal protections for animals are sufficient, or, in the alternative, whether new legal strategies, such as “legal personhood” or fundamental “legal rights” for animals should be pursued. Throughout the course, extra-legal theories and concepts from the fields of philosophy, sociology and cultural studies relating to non-human animals and the relationship between human and non-human animals will help students to understand the background and underlying context of laws and decisions dealing with animals.  We will consider the multiple roles that non-human animals play in human lives, and look at the laws and ethics that inform this relationship, including: animals as food (factory farming, hunting regulations and practices); animals as pets and companions; the use of animals in medical research; the roles that animals play in cultural and religious traditions and animals in entertainment; and issues of animal endangerment and preservation (international trade in animal parts, protection of endangered species).

 

University of Pennsylvania Law School

Animal Law & Ethics

Penny Ellison

This seminar course will focus both on fundamental legal and ethics questions, including human duties toward animals and whether conceiving of rights for animals is appropriate, as well as on an understanding of the current legal and administrative means through which the relationship between humans and animals is regulated. We will discuss the varying viewpoints expressed by animal advocates, generally falling into the category of either “animal welfare” or “animal rights” positions. We will discuss the fact that nonhuman animals are not legally “persons” and currently have no legal rights, per se, only limited legal “protections.” Discussion of animal rights will necessarily entail an examination of the sources and characteristics of fundamental rights, why animals have historically been denied them, and whether legal rights are appropriately limited to humans. Further, we will discuss whether, if any such rights were recognized, what nonhuman animals should be entitled to them and, if so, to which legal rights they should be entitled. The class will also consider such issues as establishing standing to bring suits on behalf of animals, constitutional issues raised in animal protection cases and an analysis of the law and theory behind the protections afforded (or not afforded) animals under various federal and state laws. The focus will be on the status of animals as property, the doctrine of standing, and the nature of legal rights as applied to nonhuman animals. We will examine the content and enforcement of state anticruelty laws, the Endangered Species Act, the Federal Animal Welfare Act and accompanying regulations. A research paper (or possibly a few short papers) will be required. As this course is intended, in part, as an opportunity to engage in an open dialogue on the potential for developments in this nascent area of law, attendance and participation in class discussion is crucial.

 

University of Quebec in Montreal Law School

Animal Species and the Law

Martine Lachance

 

University of San Diego School of Law

Animal Law

Jane Henning

Animal Law is a survey of the wide range of laws pertaining to animals. Some of the topics to be discussed during the semester include how animals have been defined by courts and legislatures, interpretation and enforcement of federal and state animal welfare statutes, and liabilities connected with the guardianship/ownership of animals. We will also consider the ethical implications of using animals for experimentation and food. In addition to reading the materials and participating in class discussions, students will be required to write a substantial paper on an issue related to animal law.

 

University of San Francisco School of Law

Animal Law

Bruce Wagman

A survey of the law’s understanding and treatment of animals by looking at the development of federal and state policies toward wild, domestic, and companion animals. Specific topics may include the history of animal law, the concept of animals as property, the application of tort and remedies law to injuries by and to pets, protection of animals by cruelty and other laws, and constitutional issues raised in cases involving animals.

 

University of Texas School of Law

Animal Law

Susan Hightower

Is there a place in the law for consideration of the interests of animals? This course will examine the jurisprudential basis and theoretical underpinnings of the current status of animals in our legal system. It is not an animal rights course. Students will read a diverse cross-section of legal theory and case law delving into controversial moral, ethical, and public policy considerations in balancing interests of animals and humans. Thus, the course will examine the developing field of animal law through the prism of traditional legal disciplines, including torts, contracts, criminal, regulatory, administrative, and constitutional law.

 

University of Victoria

Animals, Culture and the Law

Maneesha Deckha

This seminar will explore the relationship between nonhuman and human animals, focusing on the legal and ethical issues raised by the status of animals as property. In particular, we will look at how recent technological and cultural developments have redrawn the human/nonhuman boundary, implicating what it means to be, and resulting in a renewed questioning of the current scope of legal personhood. Specific topics include the examination of: 1) the current law characterizing animals as property, including the nature of a legal right; 2) the various western philosophical positions on animals that have animated the law; 3) the idea of animal rights and other interests and the different types of theories (deontological, utilitarian, ecofeminist, postcolonial, queer, poststructuralist) that argue for greater legal protection of animals; 4) the types of legal alternatives proposed to animals’ current status as property; and 5) the impact that greater legal protection for animals will have on marginalized human communities and the commitment to cultural pluralism, the politics of animal advocacy movements in this regard, and the possibility of human and animal rights coexisting. With this theoretical foundation, we will then consider the laws and ethics surrounding the use of animals in medical research through various techniques such as vivisection, transgenics and xenotransplantation; as food (factory farming, fast food); as companion animals; and as symbols of meaning in cultural and religious traditions. Issues of difference and hierarchies organized along gender, race, class, culture, ability, religion, and species will be integral to this course.

 

University of Washington School of Law

Animal Law

Adam Karp

Examines substantive law and procedure, specific cases, legislation, and background societal mores that drive an evolution and backlash in the level of jurisprudential and legislative comfort with new ways of seeing and speaking about animals other than humans.

 

University of Windsor

Jerry Simonelli

This course will consider statutory and case law encompassing human-animal interactions, the current status of animals as living property, and balancing of competing interests within the context of traditional areas of the law. Beyond traditional areas of the law, we will explore and debate whether the current legal status of animals as living property is antiquated and needs re-evaluation and modification to reflect evolving societal beliefs and values. In this regard, we will explore theories and proposals to grant limited rights and advance the legal status of animals, including proposals for granting limited personhood status. Some of the topics we will cover include: what is animal law, an overview of conditions/treatment of animals (companion, farm, research, entertainment), the impact on humans of farm animal treatment (environmental, public health, workers), the legal concept of “necessity” and core ambiguity in the law, what is an “animal” and exploring difficulties in legislative interpretation, overview of federal and state/provincial laws and court interpretations affecting the welfare of animals, the role of lawyers and legal system in advancing greater protection for animals, strategies for evolution of law (legislative, political, economic, common law, ballot initiatives), international law and evaluation of laws and constitutions of other countries.

 

Valparaiso University School of Law

Animal Law

Rebecca Huss

This course examines materials relevant to understanding the legal status of animals. It will cover a number of topics related to animal law, including various issues that arise under the laws of property, contracts, torts, trusts and estates. It will also incorporate criminal and constitutional law issues and will consider the evolution of the law’s understanding and treatment of animals by examining selected federal and state legislation.

 

Vermont Law School

Animal Rights Law

Steven M. Wise

Nonhuman animals have no legal rights. We will discuss some of their current legal protections, the problem of obtaining standing, as well as sources and characteristics of fundamental rights-why humans are entitled to them, why nonhumans are denied them, whether they should be limited to humans and, if not, what rights should nonhuman animals be entitled to under common law.

 

Wake Forest University School of Law

Animal Law

Sue Grebeldinger

A survey of legal, ethical, and policy issues regarding non-human animals. Topics include anti-cruelty laws; medical and scientific research; liability for injuries to, or caused by, animals; hunting laws; and standing for animals. Students will write a paper in this course.

 

Washington and Lee University School of Law

Animal Law

Krysia Nelson

Animal law is a non-traditional but rapidly developing legal field. It is a subset of traditional areas of law, such as tort, contract, criminal, and constitutional law, characterized more specifically by the legal implications of human interaction with animals across a variety of settings (household, commercial, recreational). This course will examine not only statutory and decisional law specific to animals, but also how animals are treated within the framework of laws that are not specifically, nor obviously, tailored to addressing the human/animal relationship.

 

Wayne State University

Jerry Simonelli

This course will consider statutory and case law encompassing human-animal interactions, the current status of animals as living property, and balancing of competing interests within the context of traditional areas of the law. Beyond traditional areas of the law, we will explore and debate whether the current legal status of animals as living property is antiquated and needs re-evaluation and modification to reflect evolving societal beliefs and values. In this regard, we will explore theories and proposals to grant limited rights and advance the legal status of animals, including proposals for granting limited personhood status. Some of the topics we will cover include: what is animal law, an overview of conditions/treatment of animals (companion, farm, research, entertainment), the impact on humans of farm animal treatment (environmental, public health, workers), the legal concept of “necessity” and core ambiguity in the law, what is an “animal” and exploring difficulties in legislative interpretation, overview of federal and state/provincial laws and court interpretations affecting the welfare of animals, the role of lawyers and legal system in advancing greater protection for animals, strategies for evolution of law (legislative, political, economic, common law, ballot initiatives), international law and evaluation of laws and constitutions of other countries.

 

Whittier Law School

Animal Rights Seminar

Tom Kelch

This seminar will consider the moral and legal issues surrounding the treatment of domestic and non-domestic animals by humans, with a focus on factory farming and animal experimentation. The legal concept of rights will analyzed to determine whether this concept can be applied to animals. The efficacy of both the common law (example issues would be are animals nothing more than property and what damages can one recover for injury to a pet) and various statutes (including the Federal Animal Welfare Act and state anti-cruelty laws) will also be appraised. In addition, the implications of genetic engineering and the creation of new species will be considered.

 

Widener University School of Law

Animal Law

Delaware

Animal law, currently taught in nearly 80 law schools around the country, is a two-credit course that addresses the legal and ethical treatment of animals in society. As presented in the course, animal law is not synonymous with “animal rights” or with any particular political, moral, or ethical agenda. Rather, it is an objective and methodical examination of a unique, specialized area of the law that continues to receive increasing public interest. The required text will be Animal Law, 3rd ed., Frasch et al. (Carolina Academic Press). Selected excerpts from articles in the journal Animal Law (published by the Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College) and other readings will also be assigned. Because animal law is not a traditional legal field , assigned topics will be framed in terms of familiar contexts of the law such as tort, property, contract, and criminal law as delineated in case law and statutes. Specific topics to be covered will include: definitions of animals (e.g. wild vs. domestic vs. companion); the legal standing of animals; animals as property; non-economic damages for harm to animals; veterinary malpractice; anti-cruelty laws.

 

Widener University School of Law

Animal Law

Harrisburg

In this course we will address various topics in the rapidly developing field of animal law. The course will focus on the history of animal cruelty laws; Pennsylvania’s anti-cruelty statute; dog bite liability; search warrants; government regulation of animals; animal fighting; and legal analysis of recent cases.

 

William Mitchell College of Law

Animal Law

Corwin Kruse

Share