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Albany Law School

Arizona State University College of Law

Animal Law. The course will survey the growing field of animal law. Students will analyze laws affecting many types of animals including companion animals, farm animals, animals in laboratories, animals used for entertainment and wildlife in the contexts of constitutional, tort, criminal, administrative and contract law. The course will provide an overview of state and federal case law, regulations and statutes, focusing on Arizona Laws. Students will present a mock oral argument or other presentation replicating a court, legislative or administrative hearing, in class, using either a civil or criminal animal law case, regulation, statute, ordinance or proposed legislation.

Boston University School of Law, Lois Karfunkel

Animal Law. This seminar presents an introductory survey of the historical and current status of nonhuman animals in this rapidly developing field of law. The seminar will examine animal issues in the context of a broad span of substantive legal areas, including contracts, torts, wills and trusts and criminal law. Additionally, we will study key federal and state legislation regulating animal welfare and animal treatment. We will explore constitutional principles such as standing jurisprudence that are applicable to the emergence and development of animal rights. Through written materials and class discussion, we will consider the tools available to lawyers to effectuate social, cultural, and legal change to our perspective on how we see, speak about, and protect non-human animals. The seminar will focus on both a scholarly understanding of the subject and a pragmatic approach to practice in this area, whether as a specialty or as related to other more traditional legal fields.

Brooklyn Law School, Mariann Sullivan

Animal Rights Law. This course will examine the legal status of non-human animals, including an overview of the relationship between humans and animals, how it varies according to the use to which animals are put and scientific understanding of the capacities of animals, and how it has evolved historically; how judges, administrators and other policymakers see and speak about animals; philosophical points of view on the appropriate relationship between humans and animals; current animal protection laws; “standing” and the problems of litigating on behalf of animals; the classification of animals as “property” and whether such classification is appropriate or important; legal protection and regulation of the bond between humans and companion animals; regulation of the treatment of animals in various institutional settings, including agriculture; and various arguments and strategies for reform. From time to time there will be guest speakers.

California Western School of Law, Kristina Hancock

Animal Law. Every other year, usually in the fall Content: This three-unit class will focus on the evolution, interpretation and enforcement of laws protecting animals; evaluate whether, how and why such laws should be modified; and consider the ramifications of such change. The course objectives are to increase awareness of animal law issues; to evaluate the development of existing laws regarding the use and treatment of animals in human society, the rationale behind them, and their effectiveness; and to stimulate critical thinking regarding ways to improve those laws. Course material will be primarily from the Animal Law casebook. Classes will include guest speakers on a variety of topics.

Case Western Reserve University, Kathy Hessler

Animal Law.

Chapman University School of Law, Timothy Canova

Animal Law. This course examines the way that the legal system and culture treat non-human animals.The course will consider legal doctrines addressing a broad array of issues about human-animal interaction, including legal definitions of animals, animals as property, tort liability for harms caused by and to animals, criminal liability, contracts concerning animals, federal and state regulation concerning both domestic and wild animals, and animal rights. The course will also consider theoretical, ethical, and socio-political perspectives on human-animal dynamics. This course, however, does not cover the Endangered Species Act and similar state laws, which are covered in several other classes (such as Environmental Law, Land Use Regulation, Ecosystems & Legal Problem-Solving, and Natural Resources Law & Policy Seminar).

Cleveland Marshall College of Law, Benita Pearson

Animal Law. Animal Law focuses on the legal, social and biological nature of nonhuman animals, including companion animals, wildlife, and animals raised for food and research. The course will consider such topics as: 1. Areas of national concern and statutory interpretation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Endangered Species Act, federal cruelty laws, the Animal Welfare Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act and the Humane Slaughter Act; 2. State and federal constitutional issues, e.g., exemptions from laws involving the use of animals, “hunter harassment” laws, federal constitutional standing issues involving animal interests, and state constitutional provisions regarding the protection of natural resources; and 3. Local and state law concerns, including common law property as applied to animals, state cruelty laws, agricultural treatment of animals and protection of livestock, municipal regulations of pets, and the changing status of animals in society.

Columbia Law School, David Wolfson

Seminar in Animal Law. This course will examine the legal classification of non-human animals, the laws that govern their treatment, as well as a number of topics that fall within the general headings “animal law” and “animal rights.” Such topics include: the historical and philosophical treatment of animals, and how such treatment has impacted the ways in which judges, administrators, politicians, lawyers, law students, legal scholars and lay people see and speak about animals; how humans interact with, and use, animals; current animal protection laws; recent political campaigns to reform animal protection laws; “standing” and the problems of litigating on behalf of animals; the classification of animals as “property” and whether such classification is appropriate or important; and whether current legal protections for animals are sufficient, or, in the alternative, whether new legal strategies, such as “legal personhood” or fundamental “legal rights” for animals, should be pursued. From time to time there will be guest speakers.

Cornell Law School, Dana Campbell

Animal Law. This cutting-edge and constantly evolving field of law will explore the statutory and case law in legal, social, or biological nature of nonhuman animals is an important factor. The course encompasses companion animals, wildlife, and animals raised for food, entertainment, and research, and will traditional law topics like torts, contracts, criminal law, constitutional law and federal laws as they with animals. Grade will be based on participation in open-minded discussions and a paper.

Dalhousie Law School, Vaughan Black

Animals and the Law. This seminar examines legal issues pertaining to non-human animals. It is concerned with how such entities have been conceptualized by the law and with how they should be. Should animals be viewed as objects (property), as legal subjects (rights holders), or as something else altogether? This debate will provide the context for examining the history of animal protection legislation and current issues relating to animals. These include the constitutional authority to legislate with respect to non-humans, animal cruelty (including such specific topics as experimentation on non-human animals, treatment of farmed animals, and hunting), endangered species legislation, standing in animal welfare/rights litigation, market-based approaches and civil disobedience by animal activists.

DePaul University College of Law, Cherie Travis

Animal Rights Law. This course will offer a comprehensive examination of the rights afforded to animals as well as a look at the application and enforcement of those rights. Topics will include a history of animal rights, legislation, case law, ethics, lobbying and a discussion of issues confronting major lobbying and activist organizations. Constitutional, land use planning, international and environmental law issues will also be presented. The course will be taught through lecture and extensive class discussion including case and regulation analysis.

Drury

Animal Law I, Jana Bufkin

Duke University School of Law, William Reppy, Marilyn Forbes

Animal Law. This course will examine a number of topics related to the law of animals, including various issues that arise under the laws of property, contracts, torts, and trusts and estates. It will also examine various criminal law issues and constitutional law questions. The class will consider such issues as the definition of “animal” as applicable to anti-cruelty statutes, the doctrines of strict liability and negligence related to injuries caused by animals, the collection of damages for harm to animals, establishing standing for animal suits, first amendment protections, and the nuances of various federal laws. A paper is required.

Duke University School of Law, William Reppy, Marilyn Forbes

Animal Law Clinic. This clinic will provide students the opportunity to work on a variety of legal matters related to animals and include both classroom and outplacement field work components. Students will be expected to complete a minimum of sixty hours of outplacement work under the supervision of practicing attorneys over the course of the semester. Placements may be with local attorneys in private practice (handling veterinary malpractice cases, for example), local district attorneys’ offices (working on cruelty prosecutions), or national animal advocacy organizations (such as the Humane Society of the United States and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). In preparation for their placements, students will be taught relevant areas of substantive law and trained in practical skills appropriate to their likely placements. Guest lecturers will also be invited to talk to the students about practicing in the field of animal law. In addition to attending class and performing their clinical work, students will be expected to keep a detailed journal about their outplacement work or write a paper on an animal law topic. Students’ grades will be based on (1) the quality of their clinical work (assessed in consultation with the outplacement supervisor and including an independent review of any written work product); (2) the quality of their detailed journal or paper; and (3) their attendance at, and participation in, class sessions, including the quality of their presentation(s).

Duke University School of Law

Animal Law Outplacement. This outplacement course will provide students the opportunity to work on a variety of legal matters related to animals. Students are required to complete a minimum of fifty hours of outplacement work under the supervision of the practicing attorneys over the course of the semester. Placements may be with local attorneys in private practice (handling veterinary malpractice cases, for example), local district attorneys’ offices (working on cruelty prosecutions), or national animal advocacy organizations (such as the Humane Society of the United States and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). The course instructor will assist in making the placements for the students and will maintain close communication with both the students and the placement supervisors on the amount, type, and quality of the work performed.

Emory University School of Law, Ani Satz

Animal Law

Florida Coastal School of Law, Elizabeth DeCoux

Animals and the Law. This course is an exploration of the historical and evolving legal status of non-human animals in the United States. Students will examine cases, arising in a variety of contexts, in which resolution of the dispute depends upon policy decisions about the nature of non-human animals. Students will explore whether there is a consistent, coherent theoretical framework for the decisions that courts, legislatures and administrative bodies make about non-human animals.

Florida State University College of Law, Cynthia McNeely

Animal Law. An introduction to domestic and wild animal legal issues. This course reviews the historical development and current status of the human-companion animal relationship, and human efforts to protect wildlife, by analyzing local, state, national, and international case law and materials.

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