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Kentucky Courses

Bellarmine University

Freshman Seminar

Animal Studies

Tami Harbolt-Bosco

Animal Studies will introduce students to the history and philosophy of animal rights and welfare. The 19th century and 20th century humane movements coincided with other historical social rights movements, such as temperance, abolition, suffrage, and civil rights. Studying the rights of animals allows for a reading of Western culture that considers gender, class, ethnicity, the role of scientific authority, and an exploration of the species boundary.

Philosophy

Applied Ethics

 

Eastern Kentucky University Animal Studies Major

The animal studies program at EKU is a cross-disciplinary, applied science program concentrating on non-human animals and their interactions and relationships with people. This unique interdisciplinary approach will help you to fully explore the complexities of animals’ lives, human-animal relationships, ethical and moral concerns about animals, representations of animals and humans, and the significance of animals in human evolution, history, culture and civilization. You will work with faculty who are exceptional teachers, mentors, and scholars. They are passionate about the field of Animal Studies. Best of all, they are eager to share their knowledge with you. Faculty at EKU consider teaching to be their primary mission. Most of our classes are small so that you can get the individual attention you need to thriv Your faculty advisor will work with you to customize your educational experience so that you can focus on specialized areas for particular jobs that you want to target. The Animal Studies major is also great preparation for graduate or professional schools. Your learning experience will extend far beyond the classroom. We have created opportunities for you to apply your knowledge under the supervision of faculty mentors. You may choose to develop and conduct your own research projects, work side-by-side with faculty on their research, or participate in a cooperative study program that allows you to earn course credit, take home a paycheck, and gain valuable on-the-job experience doing work related to Animal Studies.  Courses include:

Introduction to Animal Studies

Robert Mitchell

A survey of the field of animal studies, focusing on animals’ lives and histories, and the human experience of animals as food, as objects of entertainment, spectacle and science, as companions, and as representations. The course will introduce students to the field of animal studies by reading, discussing, thinking, and writing about various traditions in the field, including anthropology, art, biology, history, literature philosophy, psychology, and sociology.

Animals in Literature

Prerequisite: ANS 200(C) or ENG 102 or ENG 105(B) or HON 102, or instructor approval. A survey of the rhetorical and thematic use of animals in imaginative texts. ANS 320 Animals in History. (3) A. Prerequisite: ANS 200(C) or instructor approval. A survey of the history of animals in European and American cultures, from prehistory to the modern age. Animals are examined as food, objects of entertainment and knowledge, companions, and representations.

Applied Learning in Animal Studies

Prerequisites: ANS 200 (C), and BIO 112 (C), and ANT 120 (C) or departmental approval. Work in placements related to academic studies. A minimum of 80 hours employment required for each semester hour credit. Course may be repeated for up to 16 credits total. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Animal Enrichment

Crosslisted as PSY 350. Prerequisite: ANS 200 or PSY 200. Covers the concept and practice of animal enrichment. Students will learn about the theoretical and applied aspects of enrichment and will acquire experience designing and implementing enrichment. Credit will not be awarded to students who have credit for PSY 350.

Senior Seminar

Prerequisite: ANS 200(C) and 15 hours of courses required for the ANS major. The examination of a topic in animal studies from the perspectives of application, science, and humanities. May be retaken once, provided the subject matter differs each time.

Topics in Animal Studies

Prerequisite: ANS 200(C) and 9 hours of courses required for the ANS major, or instructor approval. The course examines a topic in animal studies in detail. May be retaken once, provided the subject matter differs each time.

Senior Exit Course in Animal Studies

Prerequisite: Senior standing and major in animal studies. Students will complete the Senior Exit Survey and the Senior Knowledge Exam in this course.

Great apes

Robert Mitchell

A survey of research on great apes, and human-great ape interaction, focusing on animals’ lives and histories, and the human uses of great apes as food, as objects of entertainment, spectacle and science, as companions, and as representations.

Dog

Robert Mitchell

The course examines a topic in Animal Studies in detail. May be retaken once, provided the subject matter differs each time. The current incarnation is a survey of the dog in culture, science, history, literature, art, and human relationships. Students will gain knowledge of current scientific knowledge about dogs, as well as of diverse ways of thinking about dogs. The class will employ mostly discussion format with some lecturing.

Animals In History

Robert Mitchell

A survey of the history of animals in European and American cultures, from prehistory to the modern age. Animals are examined as food, objects of entertainment and knowledge, companions, and representations. Students will become familiar with diverse approaches to history, and will develop their knowledge of a particular historical topic through independent reading and research. The class will employ mostly discussion format with some lectures.

Social Psychology Of Human-Animal Relations

In this course, students will examine, from a sociological/social psychological perspective, how our uses of animals as food, companions, competitors and collaborators influence human and social existence. Students will become familiar with various social psychological research methodologies for studying human-animal interactions and the contributions various social theories regarding animal-human relations and interactions. The class will employ discussion boards, quizzes, student presentations, and a term paper to assess these learning objectives. The overall course goal is to introduce students to the sociological/social psychological connections between human and nonhuman animal worlds.  Students will explore human-animal bonds and conflicts through selected readings from our assigned texts and other readings, class discussions and the student presentations and papers. University students will be expected to think, present and write critically within this growing social psychological subfield of human-nonhuman animal relations.

Animal Ethics

Matthew Riley

What are animals and what are our ethical responsibilities to them? This course introduces students to the major ethical questions in animal ethics and explores a variety of philosophical and religious ways of framing human-animal relationships: Is it ethical to eat animals, experiment upon them, or to keep them in zoos or as pets? Do animals have rights? What does the Bible say about animals and what does the Christian tradition teach us about compassion and mercy towards animals? Do all dogs go to heaven? How does animal ethics challenge and expand traditional models of religious ethics?  Students will engage with and compare a wide range of questions and insights from animal ethics, animal studies, animal science, art and culture, and environmental philosophy to understand human relationships to animals. We will also examine how religious traditions, most notably Christianity, transmit and inform contemporary views and ethical frameworks that guide our treatment of other living things.

University of Louisville

Philosophy

Philosophy of Animal Rights

Andrea Reed

Philosophy

Environmental Ethics

Avery Kolers

Examination of the moral status of the natural environment and ethical problems of human/environment interaction.

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