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HAS Courses in the Southeast

Appalachian State University

Global Studies

Jeanne Dubino

Animal Planet: Animal Encounters in the Age of Globalization. This course explores the ways globalization is altering the nature of human-animal encounters. We will examine many kinds of global encounters, including those arising from companionship (pets); travel, hunting, and sport; food and consumption (e.g., livestock); and science (e.g., lab animals). We will start by considering an especially modern way of engaging with animals-through the symbolic, the artistic, and the visual (representations and shows like Animal Planet and its spin-offs). As we enter the world’s sixth major species extinction, we will consider how, in the face of the decreasing diversity of species, we increasingly engage with animals through representations of them. We will look at a range of media from around the world that address how globalization affects and informs human-animal encounters: fiction, critical essays from a range of disciplines (ethology [animal behavior], anthropology, history, archeology, etc.), travel literature, TV series, movies, cartoons, stuffed animals, and more. Globalization is defined in part by increasing interconnectedness and interdependency, and animal studies are especially concerned with relationships, symbiosis, and environments. We will consider the interchanges between the local and the global; that is, some of the ways that local cultural attitudes toward animals are being affected by globalization, and how globalization is affecting localized beliefs and practices.

Appalachian State University

Kathryn Kirkpatrick

Cultural Studies: Representing Animals in Irish Literature and Culture

From the shape-shifters of the sagas and the simian Paddies of the nineteenth century to the Celtic Tiger of recent years, non-human animals have figured powerfully in portrayals of Irishness.  These portrayals tell us a great deal about the ways discourses of animality construct the human, and often, the sub-human.   Indeed, Maureen O’Connor has argued that the constructed proximity of the Irish to animals justified the colonial use of force to subdue and contain them.  Conversely, making the ideological connections between the oppression of women, the Irish, and animals, prominent nineteenth-century animal advocates from Ireland like Richard Martin of Galway, worked for both human and animal liberatory practices.  In this class we will work at the intersections of Cultural Studies, Irish studies, and Critical Animal Studies, examining the relationship between humans and animals within Irish writing and cultural production.  Texts will include Raymond Williams’ The Country and the City, Steve Baker’s Picturing the Beast: Animals, Identity, and Representation, Lisa Kemmerer’s Sister Species: Women, Animals, and Social Justice, and selected Irish poems, stories, plays, and films.  Requirements include short essays, a presentation, and a final paper.

Bellarmine University

Freshman Seminar

Tami Harbolt-Bosco

Animal Studies. Animal Studies will introduce students to the history and philosophy of animal rights and welfare. The 19th century and 20th century humane movements coincided with other historical social rights movements, such as temperance, abolition, suffrage, and civil rights. Studying the rights of animals allows for a reading of Western culture that considers gender, class, ethnicity, the role of scientific authority, and an exploration of the species boundary.

Bellarmine University

Philosophy

Applied Ethics

Broward College, South Campus

English

Vicki Hendricks

Animal-Human Interaction in Literature – Fully Online Course. Animals in literature have always captivated readers. The evolution of animal-human relationships from the 19th century to the present offers an interesting field of study, including animals as symbols, concepts of ownership versus companionship, cooperation and conflict in nature, suffering and morality, and literalist anthropomorphism as opposed to otherness-in-connection. Poe’s “The Black Cat,” Tolstoy’s Strider: The Story of a Horse, London’s The Call of the Wild, Woolf’s Flush: A Biography and contemporary works Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand, The Life of Pi by Yann Martel, and The Dogs of Babel by Carolyn Parkhurst are the selected texts for discussion and written analysis.

Christopher Newport University

Psychology

Sherman Lee

The Psychology of the Human-Animal Bond: Exploring our Relationship with Animals. Animals play a central role in the lives of their human companions. This course will explore the complex relationship between humans and animals in a variety of contexts. Topics will include research methods, pets, animals for food and clothing, animals in human culture and health, psychological disorders, welfare and cruelty, and death and dying. Although the study of the human-animal bond draws from a range of disciplines, the topics in this seminar will be framed from a psychological perspective with an emphasis on the cognitive, emotional, and motivational components of the human experience.

Duke University

Women’s Studies

Kathy Rudy

Religion and Moral Status of Animals. Recognizing that religions are key shapers of people’s worldviews and formulators of their most cherished values, this course seeks to understand how religions help carve out the boundary between human and non-human animals, and instruct humans in the ethical treatment of animals. We will survey the teachings and practices toward animals in various religious traditions including Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and various indigenous and Native peoples spiritual practices. As part of the natural world, some religions deify animals and/or represent transcendence in animal form. At the same time, other religions can so promote the superiority of humanity that earth and animals are left with little to no moral consideration. This class will examine the formal and informal positions various religions have taken up in relation to the non-human. How is the struggle for animal liberation framed in each tradition? How does it relate to the way other disenfranchised beings are treated within that religion? Are their links between a religion’s treatment of animals, and its treatment of women, racial and ethnic minorities, or other “outsiders”? How would those links be described?

Duke University

Women’s Studies

Kathy Rudy

Animals and Ethics: Rights, Welfare, and Beyond. The goal of this class is to survey different approaches to ethical thinking in relation to non-human animals.  In the world named but not captured by the term “animal rights,” philosophical, ethical, and legal theories once sanctioned for use only in relation to humans are now being applied to animals with a varying array of outcomes and conclusions.  This course will examine different strategies of animal advocacy as they are manifested in Kantianism, contract based theories, utilitarianism, welfarism. We will also read works that critique all Western philosophies as inadequate for dealing with non-human animals.  The animal advocacy movement is filled with activists, philosophers, political theorists, feminists, lawyers, and representatives of many different intellectual traditions who disagree about the status of animals, about whether or not we should eat them or wear them or hunt them or train them for entertainment or keep them in our homes.  We’ll investigate these conflicts throughout this class by looking at the needs of particular animals.  While most other social movement of the twentieth century had their academic origins in disciplines like history or literature, animal advocacy is centered squarely in ethics and philosophy.  We’ll study many of those originating texts and compare and contrast differing methods and approaches.  Moreover, we’ll try to understand the differences between animal rights and other liberation movements (like women’s rights and civil rights) in order to see why ethics plays such an important role.

Duke University

Women’s Studies

Kathy Rudy

Nature Culture Gender. This course studies the implications and effects of current understandings of human identity, and how it forms our perceptions of other animals, the natural environment, and our own bodies.  Over the last twenty years, the academy has engaged itself in rigorous interrogations of heretofore “natural” sites of difference.  Formations such as gender, race, sexual preference, ethnicity once thought to be hardwired in the body are now being theorized as culturally constructed.  The most recent addition to this scholarship challenges the distinction between human and non-human; the figure of the great ape is coming into focus as the newest agenda in this project. Reflecting on how we treat other animals-and in particular our closest relatives, the great apes-can tell us much about what we think about ourselves.  How far should we go in extending the boundaries of the human concept of morality?  Do the subjectivities and emotional lives of other beings exist or matter? Does respecting only that which is similar to us imply that we only take our own human nature as the pivotal reference of value?  If being human sets the standard of value for everything on earth, what are the consequences of such thinking for non-humans?  How should we behave toward that which is radically different, and why?  What we eat and what we do not eat, what we kill and do not kill, what we define as cannibalism and what falls outside that definition reveal insights about ourselves, our own bodies, and our own subjectivities.  We will study the intersection of great ape/human boundary and gender theory in a number of different ways.  Do women relate to nonhuman animals differently than men do?  Why?   What kinds of gendered behaviors do primatologists see in the various great apes themselves, and how have those narratives been appropriated by culture?  What stories in culture reify our sense of the “gentle giant” gorillas, or the combative chimps, or the matriarchal sex-crazed bonobos, or the independent and isolated orangs?  Are these stories really about them, or us, or both?  Are male great apes great hunters or themselves hunted?  Are female great apes caring nurturers or infanticidal murderers?  Do different primatologists see different things?  How does the gendering of great apes relate to the gendering of humans?  What kinds of experiments do we perform on these animals and what do we gain from them? What are justifications for the ways that we use them and how might we correct some of these problems? If they really are more like “us” than we could have possibly imagined, do they need our attention as the next oppressed “minority?”

East Carolina University

Philosophy

Richard McCarty

Ethics and Animals. The primary goal of the course is to learn more about ethics or morality from considering the significance of animals in moral deliberation. So in thinking about whether animals have rights, for example, we shall also need to ask wider questions such as, what are rights and how do they fit into the system of morality? Questions such as these lead us to investigate theoretical approaches to the study of morality in general.

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Robert Mitchell

Introduction to Animal Studies. A survey of the field of animal studies, focusing on animals’ lives and histories, and the human experience of animals as food, as objects of entertainment, spectacle and science, as companions, and as representations. The course will introduce students to the field of animal studies by reading, discussing, thinking, and writing about various traditions in the field, including anthropology, art, biology, history, literature philosophy, psychology, and sociology.

Eastern Kentucky University

Philosophy

Matthew Pianalto

Animal Ethics. An examination of major theories of animal welfare and rights; consideration of issues involving the use of animals as food and other goods, animal experimentation, wildlife, endangered species, hunting and sport, pets, and zookeeping.

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Animals in Literature

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Animals in History

Dr. Robert Mitchell

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Dr. Robert Mitchell

Applied Learning in Animal Studies

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Dr. Robert Mitchell

Topics in Animal Studies

Eastern Kentucky University

Psychology

Dr. Robert Mitchell

Senior Exit Course in Animal Studies

Eastern Kentucky University

Philosophy

Matthew Pianalto

Environmental Ethics

Eastern Kentucky University

Government

Lynnette Noblitt – Chair

Animals and the Law

Eckerd College

Philosophy

Jason Sears

Ethics and Animal Welfare

Eckerd College

Philosophy

Jason Sears

Environmental Ethics. A philosophical investigation of our relationship to the natural environment, and how these considerations affect our moral obligations to other people, as well as future generations.

Florida Gulf Coast University

Theatre Program

Michelle Hayford

Devising Performance: Human-Dog Connections. We are partnering with The Humane Society of the United States’ Humane Society University to create a civically engaged original performance about human-dog connections and the abuse of dog fighting in particular. We will investigate critical performance ethnography in both theory and praxis. This is an engaged theatre laboratory in ensemble building techniques via in-class exercises to develop an original ensemble-created performance for the as yet un-named spring production of TL003: A Performance Constellation. Performance dates are in April 2013 in the Theatre Lab.

Georgia College & State University

Philosophy

Mark Causey

Animal Ethics. Animal ethics?  Do animals (other than the human ones) have ethics?  Isn’t that something distinctively human?  Could our human ethical systems, just like our physical bodies, have naturally evolved from animal origins?  If animals indeed do have at least the rudimentary building blocks for an ethic, what does that mean in terms of our ethical treatment of them?  Do animals count morally?  If so, how and to what extent?  These are some of the questions we will explore together this semester.  We will explore the ethical aspects of animals’ interactions with each other as well as our interactions with them (we are animals too, after all).  We will explore the ethical implications of some of the main ways that we humans utilize other animals: for food, clothing, entertainment, and for scientific research.  Do we humans have a moral right to utilize animals in these ways?  We will look for answers in some of our various philosophical and religious traditions from around the world.

Georgia State University

English

Randy Malamud

Representations of Animals. In this course we will engage with newly-emerging academic work in the field of anthrozoology (human-animal studies).  I am interested (and I hope you will be, too!) in what happens when human and nonhuman animals collide in the realm of culture.  I strongly encourage you to make connections between anthrozoology and whatever existing interests and expertise you’re developing in your graduate program; this shouldn’t be too difficult, as animals are everywhere.   Anthrozoology as a literary methodology reiterates the template of Marxist and feminist theory: as feminist critics, for example, look at a text and find the sublimated or oppressed presence and importance of women, or Marxists look at culture through the lens of class, anthrozoologists look at our cultural practices and texts informed by the workings of ecology, and . . . . all sorts of important things start to happen when we focus in on the decentered other (i.e., the animal).

Georgia State University

English

Randy Malamud

Senior Seminar in Ecocriticism. The topic/methodology that we’ll be studying is ecocriticism.  Short definition: ecologically-inspired analysis of culture; longer definitions to be developed as we read and write.  I will talk about my work in ecocriticism, and my sense of how it functions as a discipline and what it can and should do within and beyond the academy.

George Washington University

Philosophy

David D. DeGrazia

Moral Status and Personal Identity. This course integrates the important and challenging philosophical issues of moral status and personal identity, taking advantage of significant recent developments in the literature, and bringing the treatment of these issues to bear in investigating four areas of practical concern: the definition of death; the authority of advance directives in cases of severe dementia and persistent vegetative states; genetic engineering and cloning; and “cosmetic psychopharmacology.” The first part of the course, focusing on moral status, places a strong emphasis on animals.

George Washington University

Philosophy

David D. DeGrazia

Ethics: Theory and Applications. This course is an introduction to ethical theory, methods of ethical reasoning, and several concrete moral problems, including ethics and animals. It is based on the assumption that critical ethical reflection and open-minded engagement with diverse viewpoints can improve the quality of moral judgment. Students are expected to identify and rigorously examine their own moral presuppositions and take responsibility for developing a body of ethical reflection that withstands critical scrutiny.

Guilford College

Religious Studies

Eric D. Mortensen

Animals in Religion. In this course, we will examine the differing roles and relationships animals play in a variety of religious traditions. We begin the semester with a study of ancient humans and their religious relationship with the natural world, and look in depth at the religious roles of animals in Native American traditions of the Pacific Northwest. We will then address animals in Abrahamic thought and in various religious cultures across the globe. Some attention will be paid to so-called “world religions” including Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and Hinduism. However, we will pay considerable attention to the roles of non-human animals in more “local” traditions in Native America, areas in the Himalayas, India, China, Africa, and Circumpolar regions. We will use these particular cultural histories as paradigms in the consideration of several themes and topics. This class will take as its central theme the possibility that animals can be seen as subjects, rather than as objects. We will also devote several weeks of the course to themes including: the ritual function of animals in human religious worlds; differing understandings of animals’ relationships with the divine; deep ecology; sacrifice; divination; anthropomorphism and zoomorphism; animal consciousness and intelligence; magic; creationism, evolution, and scientific discourse; animal rights; and the relationship between human children and animals. Central to our work will be the evaluation of theoretical models of comparison and their relevance to the study of animals in the history of religion.

Guilford College

Philosophy

Nancy Daukas

Animal Minds and Ethical Matters

James Madison University

Rhetoric

Alex Parrish

Rhetorics of the Animal: Humans, Dolphins, and other People. In this course we will explore the ways various peoples have defined the human, as opposed to an animal other. What it is to be a human, a person, and an animal is not static; these definitions change over time and across cultures. What is universal, though, is the idea of a boundary between human and animal, and the ways we define either category helps define the other. Rhetorics of the Animal will feature readings from the history of rhetoric, biology, biosemiotics, literature, art history, and philosophy. Assignments will include creative work, presentation, and a research component.

James Madison University

Biology

Ruth E. Chodrow

Animal Welfare. An examination of the biological basis of animal welfare. Topics include the evolution of domestic animals, physiological and behavioral measurements of stress, welfare assessment and pain perception. Case studies examine the use of animals for companionship, food, medical research and entertainment.

James Madison University

Biology

Ruth E. Chodrow

Animal Welfare

Mercer University

David Davis

Animal Studies. In this course, we will explore some crucial questions about our relationships with animals. How do we understand them? What are our responsibilities to they? Should we eat them? Why do we develop emotional attachments to them. Animals are a perfect other, a sentient entity with whom we cannot directly communicate, so we project ideas and attitudes onto them. When we study how we relate to animals, we are studying what it means to be human.

Middle Tennessee State University

Sociology

Angela Mertig

Animals and Society. Non-human animals have played important, often unrecognized, roles throughout the history of human society. Even so, sociology, as the study of society and its component parts, has typically viewed other animals as part of the environmental back-drop that could be safely ignored. Recently, however, sociological and other disciplinary recognition of animals in society has grown. Not only have sociologists gained greater appreciation for social impacts on animals (and their environments), but they have increasingly come to see that other animals are social agents as well. This course is devoted to exploring many of the ways that non-human animals and humans interact in sociologically meaningful ways.

Morehouse College

Philosophy

Nathan Nobis

Bioethics

Morehouse College

Philosophy

Nathan Nobis

Ethics and Animals. This course will provide an overview of the current debates about the nature and extent of our moral obligations to animals. Which, if any, uses of animals are morally wrong, which are morally permissible? What, if any, moral obligations do we, individually and as a society (as well as a global community), have towards animals? How should animals be treated?

North Carolina State University

Philosophy

Gary Comstock

Open Seminar in Research Ethics. This is an online course in research ethics that has a module on the use of animals in research.

North Carolina State University

Philosophy

Gary Comstock

Human Nature. This is going to be a new course that will deal in part with ethical issues having to do with the treatment of animals

North Carolina State University

Philosophy

Gary Comstock

Research Ethics. This course deals in part with the use of animals in research

South Louisiana Community College

English

Erin Breaux

Animals in Literature

This course is an introduction to the techniques of critical reading with emphasis on theme and various genres. Students will explore various literary movements, conventions, and styles. Course content may vary by semester. In this section, we will focus on a selection of literary texts (film, novels, graphic novels, poetry) that use animals as symbols, voices, characters, or inspiration. We will analyze the texts to see how they work as literature, what they teach us about animals, what they reveal about humans and our relationships to animals, and how they provide entry to various social issues and ethical questions involving animals. We will reference cultural ideas and texts, interdisciplinary research, and recent news on animal issues, connecting these to the literary works. Ultimately, the literature this semester will help us better understand our personal, cultural, and ethical relationships with animals, and it will encourage us to reevaluate how we (humans and animals) inhabit each other’s worlds—both real and imagined.

Stetson University

English

Mary Pollock

Environmentalist on the Radical Fringe. In this course we will explore two kinds of environmentalism: the environmentalism of the Global North and the very different approach to environmentalism practiced in developing nations. When we think of radical environmentalists, Hardy Jones the dolphin advocate might come to mind, or maybe Butterfly Hill, who lived for two years in a redwood in order to prevent loggers from taking it down. This course on environmentalism will pay due at tention to heroes like this, but also to the very different kind of environmentalists from developing nations. For example, both Chico Mendes, who organized Amazonian rubber tappers to prevent deforestation, and Wangari Maathai, who initiated the Green Belt Movement among central African women, risked their lives for their people while trying to protect the environment.

University of Central Florida

Psychology

Matthew Chin

The Psychology of Human-Animal Interaction. This course introduces students to many types of human-animal interaction including “pet adoption,” “animals and our health,” “animal training,” “animal abuse,” “animal consumption” and “wild animals and zoos.” Several guest speakers provide “question-and-answer” sessions about animal training, working with wild animals and animals in zoos, and shelter work. Students also complete two projects for which they must collect empirical data about how humans verbally interact with animals and views of vegetarianism.

University of Central Florida

Philosophy

Seth M. Walker, M.A.

Animal Ethics

University of Georgia

Psychology

Janet Frick

Humans and Animals in Society. The purpose of the first-year seminar program is to explore a topic of academic and personal interest in a small classroom environment. This particular freshman seminar will be concerned with exploring various aspects of the complex relationships between human and non-human animals, ranging from the bond we have with pets, to the ethics of animal research and experimentation, to animal abuses and cruelty, all the while trying to understand how these various behaviors can all co-exist. We will explore these issues from a psychological perspective, and look at how our broader cultural assumptions and norms affect our views on these issues. Healthy debate, disagreement, and discussion are all expected in this course; students will be expected to be actively involved in class discussion each week.

University of Louisville

Philosophy

Andrea Reed

Philosophy of Animal Rights

University of Louisville

Philosophy

Avery Kolers

Environmental Ethics. Examination of the moral status of the natural environment and ethical problems of human/environment interaction.

University of Mississippi

English

Karen Raber

Animals in Literature

This course traces historical changes in the representation of animals in literary and cultural texts like film.

University of North Florida

Bart Welling

English

Wild Encounters: Uncaging the Beast in Modern Literature. Why do “trained” wild animals turn on their human masters? Why do good pets go bad? What happens when humans give expression to “the beast within”? Our airwaves and movie houses in the U. S. have long been full of sensationalistic or simply trivial answers to problems like these. Meanwhile, generations of writers and theorists have been dealing with animal behavior, human/animal interactions, and questions of human/animal identity in ways that challenge our most fundamental assumptions about who we are, what-or who-“they” are, and how “we” ought to be treating “them.” In this class we will not just encounter some of the most famous beasts in modern literature, from Melville’s white whale to Faulkner’s Old Ben to James Dickey’s nightmarish backwoodsmen in Deliverance, but will frame our encounters with them by means of critical engagement with leading animal rights philosophers, biologists, ecocritics and ecofeminists, and other participants in the growing field of what might be called animal studies. Rather than advocating a particular political agenda, our goal will be to create an open and informed dialogue about the functions nonhuman animals and “beastliness” serve in American culture, and, more broadly, about the roles literature plays in helping humankind make sense of its place in a world full of other life forms.

University of South Carolina, Upstate

Sociology

Clif Flynn

Animals and Society. This course will examine the role of animals in human society. It will examine how animals are socially constructed, it will challenge traditional representations of nonhuman animals, and study animals as minded social actors. It will apply sociological approaches to the study of human-animal relationships, and even animal-animal relationships. Finally, it will explore the oppression of nonhuman animals, and consider the moral status and rights of animals in human society.

Warren Wilson College

Biology

Robert Eckstein

Animals and Society. Explores a variety of issues regarding the relationship between human and non-human animals. Topics include animals in research and education; philosophies of animal rights and animal use; animals in entertainment, agriculture and wildlife issues; pet ownership; and cross-cultural comparisons. Discussions revolve around ideas introduced through readings, videos, and presentations by guest speakers.

Warren Wilson College

Peace and Justice Studies

Robert Eckstein and John Casey

Animal Rights; Human Obligations. The course involves an examination of the moral status of animals and the descriptive and normative recognition of human obligations toward animals, as determined by cultural perceptions and philosophical schools of thought, particularly utilitarianism and deontology.  We will consider the ways animals are used to serve human ends, e.g., food, clothing, entertainment, medical and other kinds of research, etc.; proclaimed human moral entitlements to use animals; religious attitudes toward animals; legal protections; animal welfare and animal rights.

Warren Wilson College

Philosophy

John Perry Casey

Environmental Ethics

Warren Wilson College

Philosophy

John Perry Casey

Ethical Theory and Practical Issues

Washington and Lee University

Classics

Athena Kirk

The Ancient Animal World. This course moves between the classical literary and philosophical heritage and contemporary questions of engagement with animals, exposing students to ancient taxonomies and cultural attitudes while using service learning and site visit exercises to encourage reflections on human interactions with animals.

Wofford College

Nancy Williams

The Fictional and Not-So Fictional Lives of Animals. The course is an exploration of the interconnections between the fictional and non-fictional representations of the lives of animals and our complex relationship with them. After reading fictional accounts about the human-animal relationship, such as The Island of Dr. Moreau by H.G.Wells, we move on to examine the ways in which these accounts correspond to the realities of animal lives, such as vivisection. Within this format, we will analyze some of the ethical issues relating to animal welfare and the human-animal relationship and attempt to answer the following philosophical questions: What is the nature of our relationship with animals? What can we learn about ourselves from our relationship with other animals? How should animals be treated?

Wofford College

Philosophy

Dr. Nancy Michelle Williams

Philosophy of Food

Wofford College

Philosophy

Dr. Nancy Michelle Williams

Our Peculiar Relationship with Animals

Wofford College

Philosophy

Dr. Nancy Michelle Williams

Feminism and Animals