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HAS Courses in the Northeast

Cambridge College

Humane Education

Introduction to Humane Education. This course introduces students to humane education and explores innovative educational philosophies and methods, exciting and effective ways to approach teaching and learning, and positive communication skills and conflict resolution. Forming the foundation for the issues courses that follow, Introduction to Humane Education invites students to examine the ways in which they can more fully model their message as educators, and bring the underlying concepts of good communication and teaching to their students as they incorporate the important issues of human rights, environmental ethics, animal protection, and culture.

Cambridge College

Humane Education

Animal Protection. This course covers a variety of animal issues including animal agriculture, experimentation, hunting and trapping, companion animal concerns, and more. It explores different philosophies regarding the inherent rights of other sentient animals to be free from exploitation and abuse, and encourages students to grapple with and determine for themselves their own ethics regarding nonhuman animals. Animal Protection examines the ways in which humans, animals, and ecosystems can be protected for the good of all and helps students develop techniques for teaching about complex issues in a positive manner that invites dialogue and positive solutions.

Camden County College

Animal Technology

Phil Arkow

Survey Course in Animal Assisted Therapies. The Survey Course in Animal-Assisted Therapy & Animal-Assisted Activities at Camden County College is a general orientation certificate course and the starting point for individuals seeking an introduction to the human-animal bond and its therapeutic applications. Students typically are people who have pets that they think might qualify to be therapy animals, people seeking new career and volunteer opportunities, and professionals in such fields as health care, allied health, humane and human services, social work, and a wide array of therapies.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Paul Waldau

Religious Perspectives on Animals. Comparative survey of mankind’s religious perspectives on other species.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Paul Waldau

Introduction to Anthrozoology. An engagement with the fundamental issues of the field of Anthrozoology by evaluating the history of human/nonhuman interactions, the categories into which human have sorted animals, and a variety of science-based and value-based approaches to humans’ inevitable intersection with other living beings.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Paul Waldau

Animal Ethics. Analysis of different approaches to ethics as this key human ability has been discussed in different domains and throughout history as applying to human-animal issues.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Paul Waldau

Animals, Public Policy, and the Law. An exploration of both American and other national approaches to public policy and law as factors impacting modern societies’ views and treatment of nonhuman animals. Particular emphasis is given to issues involving companion animals, wildlife, research animals, and food animals.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Malini Suchak

Research Methods in Anthrozoology. Introduction to the methods of social and natural science.  Practical experience with study design, data analysis and interpretation.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Margo DeMello

Animals as Commodities. This course looks at animals as commodities in the three main areas in which animals “serve” humans: as food, as research tool, and as pet. It provides a tool for critical evaluation of these areas of human-animal interaction from an anthrozoological perspective. In this course we will look critically at how humans use non-human animals for food, scientific research and product testing, and companionship, and will take a largely social scientific perspective, focusing primarily on the United States, but also looking at other cultures for comparative purposes.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Margo DeMello

Cross Cultural Anthrozoology. This course provides a tool for critical evaluation of human-animal interactions from the perspectives of anthropology and anthrozoology. Anthrozoology is the study of the relationship between human and nonhuman animals. Animals play profoundly important roles in the lives of humans, whether as companion, food, spiritual guide, symbol, totemic ancestor or family member. All human interactions with animals and nature take place within a cultural context. Since culture is a central concept of anthropology, this discipline provides an effective theoretical perspective for studying human-animal relationships. In this course we consider the symbolic, economic, ecological, and social consequences of human/non-human animal interaction in a variety of cross-cultural contexts. A global perspective is used to help students better understand world trends regarding modernization and its consequences to animals and their habitats. This course provides a cross-cultural understanding of the concept of the animal by examining how our relationships with animals are mediated by culture, and thus how belief systems contribute to current animal, human, and environmental social problems.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Malini Suchak

Animal Behavior/Animal Communication. The behavior of animals in their natural contexts (as evolutionary adaptations).  The means by which animals communicate with each other.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Julie Hecht

Applied Animal Behavior. The adaptation of animals to interactions with humans.  Provision of service to humans by animals.  Solutions to problems involving animals.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Sheryl Pipe

Animals in Humane Education and Development. The roles of animals in childhood development, and in our educational systems.  Developmental ties among human rights, environmental preservation, and animal protection.  Integral dimensions of a healthy, just society.  animals and animal themes in humane education.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Stephen Zawistowski

Companion Animals in Society. The social and biological history of companion animals.  The unique roles that companion animals play in human lives.  Issues of population control, and pet industry reforms.

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Animal Welfare

Canisius College

English

Writing and Animal Studies: Representations in Film/Literature

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

The Mental Lives of Animals

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Animals in Literature and the Arts

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Psychology of the Human Animal Bond

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Animal Assisted Interventions

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Maya Gupta

Understanding Indifference and Animal Abuse

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Shelters, Rescues, and Pounds

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Anthrozoological Perspectives on Zoos

Canisius College

Anthrozoology

Animal Welfare

Central Connecticut State University

Sociology

Jessica Greenebaum

Animals & Society. Using Symbolic Interaction as the main theoretical perspective, this course explores the social relationship between humans and animals and examines the social meanings which shape the role and status of animals in society.

City University of New York, Brooklyn

English

Karl Steel

Saints, Monsters, and Animals in the Middle Ages. Despite the insights of evolutionary biology, and critiques of the autonomy of the soul, self, and language based in psychoanalysis, deconstruction, and various historical methodologies, literary criticism and philosophy have persisted in considering humans as fundamentally distinct from all other worldly life. The Christian Middle Ages, with its insistence on the linguistic, rational, and ethical particularity of human life, is a key source of such dominant conceptions of the human, but its literary works may also model ways to reconceive our humanity more generously. By reading medieval works from a variety of genres, we will track the the multiple and shifting edges of humanity as it abuts on, and mixes with, the super-, sub-, and extrahuman, to seek to describe a posthumanism worthy of the name.

CUNY Brooklyn

Comparative Literature

Chia-Ju Chang

Non-human animals in post-Mao literature and culture

Clark University

Geography

Jody Emel

Feminism, Nature and Culture. The purpose of this course is to expose students to major currents of contemporary social theory that have developed around “nature” and “woman” or nature and gender. We will explore a number of important contemporary topics including: biotechnology and “life,” food and identity, the body/science/fashion, human and nonhuman animal relations, and the manner in which conceptualizations of nature and of women (or gender roles) mutually constitute and reinforce one another. Our principal goals are to analyze and critique the normative idea of what is “nature” or what is “natural” as it pertains to gender, environmental processes, other life forms, and human social and economic existence in general. Because feminists have been instrumental in leading much of this analysis and critique, we lean heavily on feminist theories. We will explore these ideas through science fiction, magical realism, cartoons, movies, other fiction, social histories and biographies. By the end of the semester, students should be adept at decoding representations of nature and gender in the popular media as well as in academic scholarship. Students should also have a reasonable understanding of the development of and debates surrounding biotechnology and gender, identity and gender, and ecofeminist thought.

College of William and Mary

American Studies

Merit Kaschig

Animal Americans: Human Animal Relationships and the Creation of America.

Non-human animals are part and particle of our everyday lives. We depend on them for sustenance, for clothes and for labor. We watch them on TV, read about them in books and magazines, fight them as “pests,” nurture them as “helpers,” contain them in zoos, draft them for wars, play with them at home, and train them to assist us at work and in emergencies.  Most importantly, we project our fears, hopes and desires onto them. Engaging with scholarship across disciplines, this course will study the relationships between human and non-human animals in historical perspective in order to shed light on the construction of US-identities from colonial times to the present.  Through the course of the semester, our investigation of literature of history, anthropology, cultural studies, philosophy, psychology, and biology as well as of motion pictures, cartoons, web-sites, nature shows, and magazines will, I hope, allow us to do the following: First, look at animal bodies as sites of conflict that reverberate in larger social movements. Second, understand human-animal relations not as carefree and casual but as carefully constructed and contested relations of knowledge and power.

Columbia University

History

Samuel Moyn

Animals from Aristotle to Agamben. This class is a reading survey about how the Western philosophical and theological tradition has conceptualized the difference between humans and (other) animals. Are humans animals? (What are animals, first of all?) If humans are animals, how to conceptualize their differences? Either way, what are the consequences for how to understand oneself and treat animals? What is the nature of human dignity, and does it depend on some plausible distinction of humans from animals? The course culminates in six prominent contemporary philosophers who have turned the traditions they have inherited towards the problem of animals. (Note: this is not a class about animal rights except indirectly, insofar as the question of whether rights might or might not accrue to animals will depend on a prior study of the status of the human-animal border.)

The Community College of Baltimore County

Betsy Gooden

Animals and Society: Diverse Perspectives

Cornell University

Animal Science

Debbie Cherney, Joe Regenstein.

Introduction to Animal Welfare. Animal welfare issues will be discussed, mainly for farm animals, but companion animals will also be considered. Both animal specific and general areas of animal welfare will be discussed.

Cornell University

Animal Science

Debbie J. Cherney

Ethics and Animal Science

Cornell University

Anthropology

Nerissa Russell

Humans and Animals

Cornell University

Anthropology

Nerissa Russell

Human-Animal Relations

Cornell University

Natural Resources

James Tantillo

Ethics and the Environment. An introduction to ethics, aesthetics, epistemology, and political philosophy as these subjects relate to the environment. We will ask the question “How should I live?” and explore the implications of different answers to that question for our treatment of nature. We will examine the various approaches to ethical theory; the relations between art, literature, religion, and morality; the objective nature of value judgments; and the subjective nature of nature. Applied topics may include such issues as the management of National Parks; the tensions between liberalism and environmentalism; and the moral implications of agriculture and of our attitudes to food.

Cornell University

Natural Resources

James Tantillo

Nature and Culture. We will examine the history of human- environment relationships, the diversity of environmental values and ethics, cultural manifestations of nature, and the role of society in forming natural resource and environmental policy. The history of natural resource conservation and management in North America, including the history and philosophy of ecology, will be introduced.

Dartmouth College

Women’s Studies

Colleen Boggs

Animals and Women in Western Literature. What do stories about animals tell us about the treatment of women in Western society? What do stories about women tell us about the treatment of animals in Western society? And why are the two so often linked in the first place? In this course, we will examine Western cultural traditions that associate women with animals, and will interrogate women’s complex response to those associations. We will ask how, when and why women and animals are jointly excluded from subjectivity and from ethical consideration. Given the advances in areas such as women’s rights, we will ask whether there have been corresponding advances in the treatment of animals, and why women feel particularly called upon to work for those advances. Statistics suggest, for example, that the overwhelming majority of vegetarians and humane society members are women. Is the ethical treatment of animals an important feminist cause? We will read literary works (Ovid, Marie de France, William Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, “Michael Field,” Ursula Le Guin, J.M. Coetzee, Ruth Ozeki) alongside religious (the Bible) and philosophical (Aristotle, Descartes, Wollstonecraft, Levinas) texts, and draw on current schools of critical thought such as ecofeminism (Carol Adams) and postmodern theory (Marin, Lippit, Wolf and Elmer) to develop an understanding of these issues.

Delaware Valley College

Animal Science

People and Animals

Delaware Valley College

Animal Science

Animal Assisted Activities and Therapy. The course explores the use of AAA and AAT in different fields including education, psychology and physical therapy. By exploring the different areas, students will learn how to develop, present and implement an AAA/AAT program and gain an understanding of the responsibilities that go along with such programs.

Delaware Valley College

Animal Science

Companion Animals

Duquesne University

Faith Bjalobok

Philosophy

Philosophy of Animals. This course examines the moral status of non-human animals in the western philosophical tradition. We will read such philosophers as Aristotle, Aquinas, Kant, Bentham, and Singer. The course also looks at the mercy perspective developed by Primatt and Scully.

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

Sociology

Irene Fiala

Social and Ethical Considerations. This course examines how human society is structured through interaction with non-human animals.  Topics include the ways in which human society has classified animals, how humans have exploited animals, how animals serve human needs and the consideration of ethical issues surrounding the use of animals for human purposes.  The content of this course will be grounded in the three main sociological perspectives: Functionalist Theory, Conflict Theory and Symbolic Interactionist Perspective.  Additionally, this course will examine how a socially constructed view of, and practices with, animals reinforce and perpetuate stratification rooted in inequalities such as racism, sexism and social class.

Episcopal Divinity School

Ethics

Norman Faramelli

The Environment, Eco-Justice, and the Christian Faith. This course will focus on basic environmental issues confronting our planet- and the necessity of developing a bicentric view if we are to be faithful to the doctrine of Creation. But in addition to concerns for air and water quality, land pollution, and the depletion of nonrenewable natural resources, we will explore and develop the linkages between the natural environment and concerns for social justice in all areas.

Framingham State College

Communications

Audrey Kali

Human Animal Relations. An examination of the contexts in which humans and animals communicate and develop relationships.  Ways in which animal lives intersect with human societies include our incorporation of them into our homes as pets; our domestication of them for food; our implementation of their skin and fur for clothing; our utilization of them for entertainment in circuses; our experimentation on them for research; our observation of them in zoos; and our recreation with them through sports.  An emphasis is placed on how human relations with animals have changed since the recent rise of interest in animal rights, protection, and welfare.  The course addresses questions such as: Do animals deserve the same moral and legal considerations typically extended to humans? What do changing ideas about animals reveal about how humans communicate amongst themselves? Are the contradictory ways in which humans have lived with animals reflected in larger human conflicts?

Frostburg State University

Sociology

Daniel Moorehead

Animals in Human Society. Students develop an understanding of how sociological perspectives and theories are used to explore the role of non-human animals in society. Students study animal/human interaction in several major social institutions – family, health, politics, economy, religion, and sports, utilizing a service learning approach. Students recognize the variety of situations in which nonhuman animals may enhance and promote human health and well-being. Students explore the nature and forms of abuse/cruelty animals are subjected to through interdisciplinary inquiry spanning sociology, criminology, moral philosophy, and law. Students examine institutionalized forms of abuse in research, zoos, hunting, sport/entertainment and food production. Course introduces students to the growing discourse surrounding “sustainability” and sustainable issues. Students also discuss the afterlife of animals.

Green Mountain College

Environmental Studies/Animal Studies

Sam Edwards

Environmental Law and Policy. This course is an introduction to the laws and policies pertaining to issues such as population, energy, pollution, land management, waste disposal, economic growth, and ecosystem management, as well as some of the theoretical underpinnings of how economic and ecological burdens and benefits are distributed within society. Students will consider historic and modern common-law mechanisms for managing land use, and modern environmental statutes including federal land management regimes, consumer protection statutes, pollution prevention regimes, and the intersection of energy regulation and transportation law with environmental laws. Using the National Environmental Policy Act’s Environmental Impact Statement process as an organizing principle, students will consider a variety of environmental issues, statutes, and case law concerning environmental regulation in the United States.

Green Mountain College

Environmental Studies/Animal Studies

Sam Edwards

Wildlife Law. This course will review the major statutes and agencies that control and manage wildlife at the state, national, and international levels. With particular emphasis on the intersection of multiple management agencies and statutory responsibilities, students will consider the network of competing protections and jurisdictions that impact wildlife management in the United States. The class will also consider larger biodiversity protection regimes that sometimes conflict with traditional wildlife management. Specific emphasis will be placed on research requirements around wildlife, including collection permits, endangered species and invasive transportation regulations, and international treaties concerning the ban or control of transportation of artifacts and samples.

Green Mountain College

Environmental Studies/Animal Studies

Matthew Osborn Ph.D.

Environmental History and Philosophy. This course provides a systematic historical and philosophical analysis of prevailing Western perspectives of the environment. Drawing on the work of historians such as Max Oelschlaeger, Carolyn Merchant, and Donald Worster, students will begin by exploring the Classical and Judeo-Christian roots of Western thought, after which they will consider how attitudes toward the nonhuman world have evolved since the collapse of the hierarchically structured Medieval world and in the wake of modern science. Students will trace current debates in environmental ethics and history through journals of record in these fields, honing their skills in research and argumentation before defending their own solutions to environmental problems in their local bioregions.

Green Mountain College

Environmental Studies/Animal Studies

Steven Fesmire

Animal Ethics. What is the appropriate ethical relationship between humans and nonhuman animals? This course is a systematic study of animal ethics, a field that has emerged as a response to the profound impact of human practices on other species. Topics will include animal experimentation, hunting, bushmeat, livestock agriculture, landscape sustainability, biodiversity, companion animals, vegetarianism, activism, suffering, animal intelligence, animal cultures, animal emotions, animal rights law, and the tension between animal rights and environmental ethics.

Green Mountain College

Environmental Studies/Animal Studies

James Harding Ph.D.

Environmental Ethics. What is the appropriate ethical relationship between humans and nonhuman nature? How should I live in light of my relationships to the natural environment and to other animals? This course is a general introduction to environmental ethics, a branch of philosophy that has emerged as a response to the profound impact of human practices on the natural environment, its ecosystems, and other species. Environmental ethics emerged as a distinct discipline in the late 1970s in the United States, but as a branch of philosophical ethics it draws from highly articulated traditions that reach back to ancient times. The perspectives we will explore in this course are relevant to how you understand yourself and nature, how you act in relation to the more-than-human world, and what policies you will endorse. The purpose of the course is not to answer all the questions we will raise, but to work together to think more perceptively, imaginatively, and effectively about environmental issues. The following are among the many topics we will explore, often through case studies: global climate change; food production and consumption; population, consumption, and the ecological crisis; energy and ethics; the tragedy of the commons in the world’s oceans; vegetarianism; the great apes, endangered species, and habitat destruction; zoos; and competing environmental philosophies. To help you grapple with issues in contemporary environmental ethics, this course will include a series of “very short lectures” on some key figures and movements in the history of ethics.

Green Mountain College

Natural Resources Management

James Harding Ph.D.

Hunting—History, Ethics, and Management

Hamilton College

English

Onno Oerlemans

The Literary Animal. Human culture has always been deeply interested in, and closely connected to, animals. Not surprisingly, literature reflects this interest in a variety of ways. In this course, we’ll examine the complexity of representing animals in literature by reading poetry, novels, and plays that reflect the human/animal divide, imagine being animal, or use animals as symbols for other purposes. We’ll also discuss how these texts reveal philosophical and moral issues that arise from our relationships with animals. Texts include those such as Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, London’s Call of the Wild, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and Barbara Gowdy’s The White Bone. We’ll also read a broad range of poetry. (Writing-intensive.) (Proseminar.)

Harcum College

Animal Assisted Therapy

Phil Arkow

Distance Learning Course in Animal Assisted Therapies. This 10-week course, taught by internationally renowned human-animal bond and AAT author Phil Arkow, offers a Certificate of Completion; this Certificate may be eligible for employer reimbursement and Continuing Education Units depending upon the requirements of the student’s employer and/or professional association.

Harvard University

Religious Studies

Paul Waldau

Religion and Animals. Students trace the history and shape of this emerging academic field and its relation to other academic disciplines. Students also examine social, public policy, conceptual, environmental, ethical and philosophical implications of the field. Class sessions are discussion-based, and students undertake both group work and a number of individualized writing projects.

Harvard University Divinity School

Religious Studies

Kimberly Patton

Animals and Religion. Focuses on the symbolism and ritual function of animals in human religious worlds. Using particular cultural histories as paradigms, considers themes such a cosmogony, hierarchy, magic, metamorphosis, antinomianism, prophecy, mimesis, hunting, sacrifice, and the role of fantastic creatures. Central to the course is the evaluation of developmentalist and other theoretical models and their impact on the history of religion.

Hofstra University

Philosophy

Ralph Acampora

Contemporary Ethical Dilemmas. Do atrocities of slavery, genocide, extreme misogyny, and animal exploitation have anything in common-such as massive scale or institutional structure? If so, (how) does that matter ethically? If not, why are some crossed? Should grave kinds of immorality be analyzed separately, and on what terms?

Keene State College

English

Literature and the Environment. This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the traditions of environmental literature. Students will learn to think across the humanities, arts, and sciences. May explore a particular group of writers, genre, historical period, or bioregion. May be repeated once as topics change.

Keene State College

Sociology

Environmental Sociology. Examines some of the important concepts and theories used by environmental sociologists to address the following substantive issues: how society and the economy have developed their relationship to the environment, efforts to expand our moral circle to include non-human life, a variety of environmental movements such as the environmental justice movement and the animal rights movement, how we measure and interpret studies of environmental concern, and some of the problems and possible solutions of building sustainable and alternative environmental societies.

Keene State College

English

Mark C. Long

Searching for Wildness

Lafayette College

English

Carrie Rohman

Humans and Other Animals in Twentieth Century Literature and Culture. This course investigates the ways in which non-human animals are situated within literary and cultural discourse and examines the more specific issue of “rights” for those animals.  We will seek to understand how various animals are valued and used in our culture, what ideas underlie such distinctions, and how these ideas have been challenged by recent work in animal rights philosophy.  The course begins with a broad introduction to the ways animals have been theorized within our own (Western) intellectual tradition and then engages the primary critical positions within animal rights debates.  These readings prepare us for the final segment of the course which examines representations of the human/animal boundary in (mostly) twentieth-century literature.  In our early discussions, we will look at questions of empathy and anthropocentrism (Walker, “Am I Blue?”) alongside philosophical and theoretical elaborations of the human/animal relationship (Freud and Bataille).  Our second unit examines classic philosophical work by Singer and Regan, and also looks at more contemporary critiques of that work (Slicer).  Among our literary considerations will be the role of Enlightenment rationality in relation to science and humanism at the turn of the twentieth century (Wells, The Island of Dr. Moreau), the reversal of traditional humanist hierarchies in science fiction texts (Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), and questions of human and animal agency, suffering, and mourning (Coetzee, Disgrace).  As part of the course you will participate in animal-related service work in the Easton area and will use our readings and discussions to contextualize that experience.  Service-learning courses aim to give you hands-on experiences, outside the classroom, that enrich and complicate your in-class studies.  Service courses also involve you in the community and allow you to examine questions and problems from a new perspective, developing your own experiential “text” that you can analyze and critique.

Lafayette College

English

Carrie Rohman

Literature & Human Experience. This course investigates how non-human animals are situated within literary and cultural discourse.  The course begins with a broad introduction to the ways animals have been theorized within our own (Western) intellectual tradition, and then engages with representations of animals and the human/animal boundary in twentieth-century literature.  We will therefore be reading a wide variety of texts that help us understand the ways animals are figured in literature.

Lafayette College

English

Bianca Falbo

Writing Seminar: Representing Animals. Animals are our companions, our scientific “models,” our evolutionary kin, our food, our genetic playthings, our fashion statements. We experience animals at home, in zoos, in the grocery store, in labs, in the “wild” and throughout the spectrum of popular media such as television and film. This course will investigate how animals are represented in language and the value systems that underwrite those representations. Among our chief considerations will be what our descriptions of animals say about us; the intersections of gender, race, and animality in language; and the question of animals “talking back.”

Lafayette College

English

Carrie Rohman

Representing Animals

Lafayette College

English

Bianca Falbo

The Dog Course

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

History

Harriet Ritvo

Introduction to Environmental History. Focusing primarily on the period since 1500, explores the influence of climate, topography, plants, animals, and microorganisms on human history and the reciprocal influence of people on the environment. Topics include the European encounter with the Americas, the impact of modern technology, and the historical roots of the current environmental crisis.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

History

Harriet Ritvo

Nature, Environment, and Empire

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

History

Harriet Ritvo

People and Other Animals

Montclair State University

Justice Studies

Lisa Anne Zilney

Animals and Justice. The course will familiarize students with scholarship on the relationships between human and nonhuman animals from a multidisciplinary perspective including the ecological, environmental, cultural, economic, social, psychological, and health dimensions of these relationships. The course will situate nonhuman animals into a larger conception of social justice.

New Century College/George Mason University

Paul Gorski

Animal Rights and Human Exploitation. Participants in this learning community will engage with a combination of critical theories, experiential learning, and dialogical practices to examine the ways in which non-human animals are exploited for human profit. We will explore, as well, the ramifications of this exploitation ecologically, as a question of sustainability, and spiritually, as a question of the impact of animal abuse on the human spirit. Among the animal rights concerns we will examine are the use of animals in entertainment, factory farming, animal testing, and sport or trophy hunting. We will discuss, as well, how individuals and organizations are fighting these practices.

New School for Public Engagement

Media Studies

Dawnja Burris

Animal Images: Representations of Non-Human Life. Non-human animals have been represented in various forms of media throughout history. From ancient instances of cave paintings to the plethora of modern day visual media, images of  “the animal” have consistently been produced by all human societies, and for a variety of complex purposes. This course traces key instances of animal portrayal through different epochs, with emphasis on identifying the ways in which humans interact with, and maintain, relationships with animals through their mediated image. Drawing upon inter-disciplinary theoretical viewpoints that explore the subject of the animal and humans’ conceptions of them, we examine and question potential motivations and consequences involved in interacting with animals via their presentation as emblems, friends, companions, humanized characters, and wild others. Examination of visual media is key to the course and students are expected to contribute visual examples to the online course blog for collective analysis, as well as co-creation of a digital gallery that will have an online opening at the end of the semester.

New York University

Animals Studies

David J. Wolfson   Animals and Public Policy. This course will provide an overview of public policy with respect to the somewhat contradictory treatment of animals by humans, with a focus on how public policy is created and how social change occurs. We will consider what public policy consists of and what actors and factors play a role in the creation of public policy; how society views animals; the capacities of animals; how ethics relates to animal treatment; how animals are currently utilized by our society; and political and other efforts to improve or alter the current treatment of animals, including the influence of science, government, business and non-governmental organizations in defining and influencing animal-related policies. We will focus on legislation, litigation, regulation, and ballot initiative and consumer campaigns and their effectiveness, as well as other strategies that relate to improving animal welfare. We will also discuss the meaning of “animal rights” and the success and impact of the modern animal protection movement.

New York University

Animals Studies

Colin Jerolmack

Animals & Society. This course analyzes the ways that animal and human lives intersect. Specifically, it examines how relationships with animals both reflect and shape social life, culture, and how people think about themselves. We will explore the myriad and contradictory positions that animals occupy in society [e.g., as pets, pests, mascots, and food] and deconstruct the social origins of these seemingly natural categories. We will also take a grounded look at what actually happens when humans and animals interact, which sheds new light on the nature of human and animal consciousness. Fundamentally, students will learn how the roles that animals take on in our lives, and the ways that we think about and relate to them, are inherently social processes that are patterned by geography, culture, class, gender, and so on. Central questions include: How do ideas about, and relationships to, animals vary across time and space? How and why did pets become honorary members of the American family? Why are some animals, but not others, granted moral status and legal protection in society? How do humans and animals coordinate interaction without language?

New York University

Animals Studies

Jeff Sebo

Ethics and Animals. This course examines the morality of our treatment of nonhuman animals. We start with a survey of moral theory. Do animals have moral status? Do we have a right to harm or kill some animals in order to benefit or save others? We consider these questions from a variety of moral perspectives, including utilitarianism, rights theory, contractualism, feminism, and contextualism. We then apply these ideas to different kinds of animal use. For example, what is the morality of our treatment of animals in food, research, entertainment, captivity, and the wild? Finally, we will explore the connections between human rights and animal rights; the legal, economic, and psychological barriers in the way of reform; and the ethics of activism and advocacy.

New York University

Animals Studies

Jeff Sebo

Animal Minds. This course examines the nature and limits of our understanding of animal minds from a primarily philosophical perspective. We start with a survey of philosophy of mind and cognitive ethology. What is a mind, and who or what can have one? How can we learn about animal minds, and what are the main research methods that scientists use to study them? We then ask what, as far as we know, animal minds are like. How do animals perceive the world? Do they have memories? Self-awareness? Language? Rationality? Pleasure and pain and emotion? Finally, we consider the philosophical implications of our answers to these questions. What, if anything, does this discussion tell us about the human/nonhuman divide, and about the nature, value, and meaning of human and nonhuman life?

New York University

Animals Studies

Jeff Sebo

Political Theory and Animals. This course examines how political communities ought to treat nonhuman animals. We start with a survey of political theory. What is the relationship between ethics and politics? What kind of legal and political status can, and should, nonhuman animals have? We consider these questions from a number of political perspectives, including utilitarianism, liberalism, communitarianism, marxism, feminism, and anarchism. We then consider how these ideas apply to particular political problems. For example, should domesticated animals count as citizens, and should wild animals count as sovereign communities? Also, what rights, if any, should animals have with respect to trials, contracts, property, and representation? And how can we put these ideas into practice?

New York University

Animals Studies

Jeff Sebo

Food, Animals & the Environment. This course examines the impact of contemporary food systems on animals and the environment. We start with a survey of ethical theory. Do we have moral obligations to animals, plants, species, and ecosystems? Is there a moral difference between causing and allowing harm? And are we morally responsible for what we do collectively? We then consider the impacts of industrial animal agriculture on human and nonhuman health and well being. Finally, we consider alternatives to industrial animal agriculture including local food, organic food, genetically modified food, and urban food. Do these food systems represent true alternatives to industrial animal agriculture? Are they capable of feeding a planet with a rising population? And if so, how can we get from here to there?

New York University

Animals Studies

Jacques Lezra

Text & Ideas: Animal Humans. “One might go so far as to define man as a creature that has failed in its effort to keep its animalness…” So writes the German philosopher Peter Sloterdijk. What sort of animal were we? Where, how, and by whom has the line between the human and the animal been drawn? With what consequences for our “human” understanding of the world? Of concepts like the “soul,” “society,” politics, the family? Is the line between the human and the animal drawn differently in different genres–in literary works, theological treatises, natural histories, paintings, films? We come at these questions from different angles, following them from antiquity to early modern responses to these questions, and in essays by contemporary philosophers and advocates. Readings: Genesis, Numbers, Euripides’ Bacchae, Plato’s Phaedrus, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Apuleius’ Golden Ass, Marie de France’ Bisclavret, Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream, Montaigne’s “Apology in Defense of Raymond Sebond, Machiavelli’s Prince, H. G. Wells’s Island of Dr. Moreau and Island of Lost Souls, Derrida’s “The Animal that therefore I am,” selections from Boccaccio, Peter Singer, Giorgio Agamben, Donna Haraway.

New York University

Animals Studies

Sarah Kay

Text & Ideas: Of Beasts & Books. According to the Book of Genesis, human beings have two distinct relationships with other animals:  in one version of the creation story Adam gives them names, in the other they are created to keep him company. Whether non-human animals are creatures to which we assign meanings, or whether they are our interlocutors, is thus a dilemma formulated from the outset. It will provide the overall framework for this course in we examine how animals are interpreted metaphorically or symbolically, as if they were texts, and how they are also represented as speaking to us, as if they were producers of texts. We work mainly on written documents ranging from the Bible and antiquity through the Middle Ages and the premodern period (mainly the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries), reaching forward occasionally into the contemporary world for current examples. Some materials are literary (like fables and fairy stories), some philosophical, others historical. We also consider visual materials from manuscript illuminations to recent films. And we evaluate the role of animals in cultural practices other than literary or artistic works-for instance, in hunting or in zoos-and discover how, in this sense, they are like texts that we can read and analyze.

New York University

Animals Studies

Una Chaudhuri

Theatre of Species: Ecology, Animality and Performance. Does the deeply human activity of art-making have anything to do with the non-human world? Can that world – the world of animals, plants, landscapes, objects, ecology – teach us – theatre makers and students – anything about what we do, how we do it, and how we might do it differently? Conversely, do we, as “culture-workers,” have any obligations to, or special resources to offer to, the increasingly threatened natural world? This Honors Seminar will stage a conversation and exploration at between the fields of theatre and performance studies and environmental and animal studies. We will ask, for example, how theater has reflected, affirmed, contested, or flagrantly ignored the growing cultural awareness of threats to the environment. What accounts has it furnished of the reasons for these threats? What models has it proposed for encountering, understanding, and responding to these threats? We will ask how “animal acts”-in plays and elsewhere-work to create meaning about human beings; and how the “staging” of animals-in zoos, circuses, theme parks-illuminates our stagings and dramatizations of the human. We will ask how symbolic “natural” spaces like wilderness, forests, and gardens have shaped our ideas about “cultural” settings like cities, suburbs, and theatres. And we will ask how performance can intervene emotionally and politically on behalf of the non-human world that is so deeply threatened today. Readings will include works by contemporary animal philosophers (Deleuze and Guattari, Agamben, Derrida), recent environmental thought (such as Timothy Morton’s Ecology Without Nature), novels (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Lives of the Animals,) films (Grizzly Man, The Cove, The Planet of the Apes), many plays (Euripides’ The Bacchae, Albee’s The Zoo Story and The Goat, Churchill’s Not Not Not Not Not Enough Oxygen and Far Away, Ibsen’s The Wild Duck, Shaeffer’s Equus, Terry Johnson’s Cries from the Mammal House, Ionesco’s Rhinoceros) and works by performance artists like Holly Hughes, Carmelita Tropicana, and Deke Weaver.

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

Animals in Art & Literature

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

Animal Minds

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

Topics in Animal Studies

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

Intro to Topics in Literary Theory: The Animal Turn

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

The Performing Animal

New York University

Animal Studies Initiative

Animals, People and Those In Between

New York University

Drama

Una Chaudhuri

Performing Beyond the Human: Animals, Ecology, Theatre. This course will explore intersections between theatre practice, performance theory and the emerging fields of animal studies and ecocriticism. How has performance, and specifically theater, reflected, affirmed, contested or flagrantly ignored the growing cultural awareness of threats to the environment? What models has it proposed for encountering, understanding and responding to these threats? Although the course will focus on dramatic literature and performance from the modern period, the age of ecology, we will compare modern and post modern “animal plays” and “eco-plays” with classical plays on similar themes. Among the themes and topics to be explored in relation to modern and contemporary theatre practice are: eco-catastrophe, eco-apocalypse, animality and the construction of the human, zoo culture and post humanism. A fundamental inquiry of the course will concern the intersection of ecocritique and theatrical semiosis: Can performance, by virtue of its unique ontology and phenomenology, offer new and unique approaches to the ecological crisis before us?

New York University

English

Una Chaudhuri

Animal Rites. This course will explore the relationship between performance and the fast-growing new field of Animal Studies, which examines the cultural meaning of human animal practices. These include not only literary representations of animals (from Aesop’s Fables to Will Self’s Great Apes), not only dramatic representations of animals (from Aristophanes’ The Frogs to Shaeffer’s Equus to Albee’s The Goat), not only animal performances in circuses and on stage, but also such ubiquitous or isolated social practices as pet-keeping, cock-fighting, dog shows, equestrian displays, rodeos, bull-fighting, animal sacrifice, hunting, animal slaughter, and meat-eating. We will study plays and films that explore the ways our interaction with animals shapes our accounts of the human, the “other” (including the racial and ethnic other), and the world.

Niagara County Community College

Psychology

Kathleen C. Gerbasi

Psychology of Human-Animal Relations. Human-Animal Relations will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of Anthrozoology. Since this is a psychology course, the main focus of the course will be Anthrozoology from the psychological perspective, however we will also touch on other academic fields in addition to psychology. Topics covered in this course represent an overview of current issues in Human-Animal Studies. This includes human’s relationships with pets, psychological and physiological benefits of companion animals, concern for animal rights and animal welfare, the link between cruelty to animals and violence toward humans, individual differences in people’s relationships with animals (including sex differences), a study of the similarities and differences between human and non-human animals, especially as related to language, communication, cognition and problem solving, and a review of moral and ethical concerns about eating meat, wearing fur and the use of animals for research and entertainment.

Northeastern University

Psychology

Perrin Cohen

Psychological Research and Personal Values. Considers historical, psychological, philosophical, sociological and spiritual perspectives regarding animal experimentation. Includes evaluation of research projects through written and oral reports.

Northeastern University

Psychology

Perrin Cohen

Experiments in Learning and Motivation. Presents alternatives to using laboratory animals for teaching purposes and thus provides an ongoing forum for discussing issues concerning the use of animals in research and teaching.

Northeastern University

Psychology

Perrin Cohen

Ethics in Research Psychology. This graduate seminar is required of all psychology graduates. It addresses ethical concerns and dilemmas that psychology students and professional research psychologists face in acquiring and using scientific knowledge.

Northeastern University

History

Clay McShane

History of Human-Animal Relations

Penn State University

Philosophy

Evelyn B. Pluhar

Ethics and Social Issues. This course examines a number of ethical issues, including the ways in which humans use animals for their own benefit or convenience. Arguments for and against such use are explored to help determine whether or not they are justified. Independent thinking and discussion are strongly encouraged, and students are evaluated on how well they can back up their views with clear, careful reasoning.

Penn State University

Philosophy

Evelyn B. Pluhar

Ethics and Animals

Penn State University

Agricultural Science

Introduction to Agricultural Ethics

Penn State University

Philosophy

Introduction to Bioethics

Penn State University

Philosophy

Philosophy and Agriculture

Penn State University

Humanities

Dr. Evelyn Pluhar-Adams

Introduction To Ethics

Penn State University – Fayette

Philosophy

Introduction to Environmental Philosophy

Purchase College, SUNY

Sociology

Matthew Immergut

Environmental Sociology. This course brings a sociological perspective to environmental issues, both past and present, by asking: Who is civilized? Who is savage? What is nature? By addressing questions of how human societies, animals, and land have shaped each other, students better understand the root causes and consequences of today’s environmental crisis. Topics include world hunger, water, and environmental equity for all.

State University of New York

History

Dorothee Brantz

Animals in History

State University of New York

History

Dorothee Brantz

Nature and the Environment in Comparative Perspective

State University of New York, Canton

Molly A. Mott, L.V.T

Veterinary Medicine

Human Companion Animal Bond. The Human Companion Animal Bond course is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human-animal relationships. Topics include mechanisms of attachment, social and psychological aspects of human-animal interactions, pet loss and bereavement, physical and mental health benefits of animals, and animal assistance therapy programs. Major focus will be on developing the student’s interdisciplinary knowledge and understanding of the issues surrounding animals in society.

Temple University

English

Dan Featherston

Animal Welfare & Human-Animal Community. Our communities include not only humans but also nonhuman animals. Unfortunately, more than 30,000 nonhuman animals are surrendered each year to shelters in our local communities and over 60% are euthanized. This community-based learning (CBL) course will focus on companion animals, working in collaboration with our community partner, the Pennsylvania Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (PSPCA). Based on a learning model of interaction and reciprocal exchange, we will combine class work with community work at the PSPCA, exploring animal welfare issues that impact the lives of humans and animals in our community. Drawing on the interdisciplinary field of human-animal studies, including rhetorical, cultural, and philosophical studies of “the animal,” nonhuman animals and human-animal relations in literature and literary theory, and the history of animal welfare and animal law, students will explore companion animal issues and conduct community projects pertaining to companion animals in the hopes of helping both humans and nonhuman animals in our community. Written work will include three major essays in which students will investigate human-animal studies, including nonhuman animals in rhetoric and literature, and the interface between human-animal studies and community-based learning.

Temple University

English

Daniel Featherston

Eco-Literature: Human-Animal Community (ENG 2900)

Tufts University

Center for Animals and Public Policy

Megan Kiely Mueller

Animals in Society I and II. These courses are part of Tufts’ Center for Animals and Public Policy’s Masters Program in Animals and Public Policy

Tufts University

Center for Animals and Public Policy

Human Animal Studies. These courses are part of Tufts’ Center for Animals and Public Policy’s Masters Program in Animals and Public Policy

Tufts University

Center for Animals and Public Policy

Paul Waldau

Religion, Science and Other Animals. Focuses on how nonhuman animals have been seen in both religious and scientific circles. Prompts the student to ask a wide range of questions, including: 1) to what extent have religious traditions affected the ways in which contemporary scientists view and speak about animals other than humans?, and 2) in what ways do contemporary religious traditions now deal with new findings of various life sciences that are pertinent to an understanding of nonhuman animals? Answers to these questions are explored in several ways, including an examination of whether the vocabularies and concepts used by those who practice both the physical and “softer” sciences when talking about animals outside the human species remain value-laden. The course also seeks clarification of the claims about other animals generally implicit and explicit in many religious traditions’ writings and beliefs.

Tufts University

Veterinary Medicine

Human Animal Relations

University of Connecticut

Interdisciplinary

Laurel Rabschutz

Introduction to the Human Animal Bond. The human/animal bond (HAB) is a mutually beneficial and dynamic relationship between people and non-human animals. This course is a review of the changing role of animals in our lives and how we interact with them. The class will discuss how the HAB is used to promote quality of life in humans through animal assisted activities. In addition, we will discuss how animals are integrated into the treatment of physical and psychological health of humans.

University of Maryland

Animal Science

Dr. W. Ray Stricklin

Animal Welfare and Bioethics. Ethical concerns related to the use of animals in modern society. Historical and philosophical overview of animal welfare and bioethics. Applied ethical discussions on human/animal interrelationships, physical and genetic manipulation, and other current issues associated with the treatment of animals used in food production, research, zoos, and as pets.

University of Maryland

Animal Sciences

Dr. W. Ray Stricklin

Special Topics: Advanced Animal Welfare (ANSC 688W)

University of Maryland

Animal Science

Sarah Balcom

Love me, hate me, use me, save me: Our conflicting views of animals. The goal of this course is to examine the evolution of modern human-animal relationships and consider some of the major social and scientific debates that have arisen in the last century as a result of our rapidly changing and diverse views about animals. Fundamentally, this is a course in anthrozoology, an interdisciplinary field encompassing sociology, anthropology, psychology, economics, philosophy, veterinary medicine, animal sciences, and public policy.  As such, this course will address a variety of topics by looking at perspectives from these diverse fields.

University of New England

English

Susan McHugh

Animals, Literature and Culture. This course examines how animals define the crossroads of literary representations and cultural formations. Writers have always turned to animal life to find moving symbols of human conditions and, with the insights of animal science research, more recently to gain a broader understanding of cognition and social development. By investigating this history of literary animal studies, this course aims to account for why species differences, especially between humans and animals, remain among the most enduring markers of social difference. In telling stories of dogs, for instance, as variously gods, pets, meat, or pests, humans mark irreconcilable cultural differences among themselves as well as set the limits of what (and who) counts as natural object and cultural subject. As we consider how species boundaries also intersect with historical constructions of gender, race, class, sex, and ethnicity, our readings and discussions will also illuminate how animal literatures model emerging forms of identity and society.

University of New Hampshire

Animal Science

William A. Condon

Animals Rights and Societal Issues. Undertakes a thorough examination of value judgments and belief structures as well as the empirical evidence involved in the issue of animal rights. Aims not to arrive at policy decisions, but to get students thinking about the issue.

University of New Hampshire

Jerilee A. Zezula

Animal Science

Animal Cruelty: NH Laws, Investigations, and Prosecution. An Internet class delivered through Blackboard Course Management System. Explains and discusses all aspects of animal cruelty, NH cruelty laws, and presents the importance and implications of recognizing animal cruelty and its link to human violence. Cruelty investigation procedures, prosecution protocol and officer field safety will also be presented. Designed as a 14-week class with a “presentation” of one hour per week accessed by the student at their convenience within a specific 3-day time frame during the week.

University of New Hampshire

Allison Powers

Animal Science

Human/Animal Bond. Explores the many aspects of the human/animal bond through required reading, writing, and discussions. Requires an 8 hour volunteer practicum.

University of New Hampshire

Jerilee A. Zezula

Animal Science

Animal Assisted Activities and Therapy. Course explores the human/animal bond in specifically goal directed activities and therapeutic interventions. Covers human/pet volunteer training; animal selection; animal assisted therapeutic applications; and animals in institutions, residential facilities, and classrooms. The text for the class is provided and covered by the special fee of $25.00.

University of New Hampshire

Animal Science

Animal Rights and Societal Issues WI (ANSC 602)

University of Pennsylvania

Veterinary Medicine

James Serpell

Veterinary Ethical Issues. A core course for first year vet students that addresses/introduces the peculiar ethical dilemmas encountered by practicing veterinarians. Combines both didactic and case-based teaching methods; the latter focusing primarily on “real-life” ethical conflicts of interest between veterinarians, their clients, and their patients.

University of Pennsylvania

Veterinary Medicine

James Serpell

Animals, Veterinarians and Society. This third year elective course aims to introduce veterinarians to the current debate on animal use and includes the following topics: history of ethical concerns about animal use; development of contemporary attitudes to animals; animal consciousness and sentience; animal rights; animal welfare science; animals and the law; welfare problems in companion animals; and various recent areas of discussion and debate ( e.g., cloning/bioengineering).

University of Southern Maine

Criminology

Piers Beirne

Animal Abuse

A new undergraduate course on the sociology of animal abuse.

University of Vermont

Animal Science

Norman Purdie, Ph.D.

Animals in Society/Animal Welfare. Every minute of the day man interacts with animals. Whether it is for companionship, for food, as a work mate, as a patient, for survival or just as co-inhabitants of earth, our relationship with animals can be very intimate. By virtue of these relationships, we all have obligations to animals. This course will seek to explore these obligations and the details that underlie them. This class will comprise a combination of lectures, discussions and case-studies. Visiting lecturers will be incorporated as appropriate.

University of Vermont

Environmental Science

Adrian Avakhiv

Culture of Nature. This course will offer an advanced introduction to current issues and debates at the intersection of environmental thought and cultural studies. The field of cultural studies – which studies the ways in which popular culture, media, the creative arts, and other forms of cultural activity interact with sociopolitical, economic, and technological developments – will be explored in terms of its potentials to address and contribute to the understanding of environmental issues and practices. We will study culture and cultural practices as both the medium through which and the terrain within which different ideas about people and nature, and different social and ecological relations, are articulated and contested. Through readings, discussion, and media viewing and analysis, we will explore and examine how ideas about nature and environmental issues are framed and represented by various media; how these images and representations are used and contested by different cultural communities; the ways in which environmental ideas circulate between the mass media and popular and alternative cultures in North America (and the world) today; the relationship between culture and environmental identity at local, regional, national, and transnational scales; and possibilities for cultivating a greener environmental culture in our lives and in the world at large.

University of Vermont

Sociology

Robbie Pfeufer Kahn

Animals and Society. This rich, new area of scholarly investigation is the subject of our course. But we also come together as readers of the printed page. Reading might seem less than exciting to young women and men accustomed to the visual acquisition of knowledge–TV, movies, computers–over the verbal. Yet the gray blocks of words on white paper in our five texts hold as much life in them as a wiggly puppy. Together, we will work on releasing the boundless energy contained in a text. The key is to look deeply at the words that create the author’s story. Our weekly written exercises and discussions will help you cultivate the ability to look deeply at the text. During the semester we will see a number of films and have several guest speakers.

University of Vermont

Science and Technology Studies

Eileen Crist

Animals, Science, & Technology. This graduate seminar investigates topics in critical animal studies in the historical wake of what has been called the animal turn. We will focus on developments in science, philosophy, ethics, and activism that explore inquiry into animal minds, the boundary between human and animal, the uses of animals for food, experiment, and entertainment, and the predicament of wild animals in modernity and in the animal economy.

Ursinus College

Environmental Studies

Jonathan Clark

Animals and Society. In recent years there has been an explosion of research in the humanities and social sciences on what has come to be called the animal question. This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of animal studies, with a particular focus on the sociological literature. Students will emerge from the course with a nuanced sociological understanding of some of the most controversial issues raised by our relationship with other animals. Among the issues we will explore are genetic engineering, factory farming, animal experimentation, and the war on “animal rights terrorism.”

Wesleyan University

Philosophy

Lori Gruen

Humans-Animals-Nature. Due to unprecedented ecological degradation and enormous inequalities in the distribution of the means of flourishing, human beings all over the world are being forced to reconsider their relationship to each other and the non-human world. In this course, we explore the character, conditions, and concerns that shape these troubled relationships. The first part of the course will discuss the philosophical basis for membership in the moral community. Do animals matter? Do future generations matter? Do trees matter? We will spend most of the course exploring how these things matter, if and when they do, by analyzing specific cases/problems: vegetarianism, cultural hunting of whales, environmental racism, and wilderness preservation. The goals of the course are to help you to think critically, to read carefully, to argue well, and to defend your reasoned views about the moral relations between humans, animals, and nature.

Wesleyan University

College of Letters

Kari Weil

Thinking Animals: An Introduction to Animal Studies. The question of “the animal” has become a recent focus across the disciplines, extending debates over identity and difference to our so-called “non-speaking” others.  This course will examine a range of theories and representations of the animal in order  to examine  how human identity and its various gendered, classed, and racial manifestations have been conceived of through and against notions of animality, as well as  how such conceptions have  affected human-animal relations and practices such as pet-keeping and zoos. We will seek to understand the desire to tame or objectify animals as well as evidence of a contrasting desire that they remain guardians of inaccessible experience and knowledge. Readings may include: Darwin, Poe,  Kafka, Mann, Woolf, Coetzee, Hearne.

Wesleyan University

College of Letters

Kari Weil

Animal Subjects. Humanity, within the Western tradition, has largely been defined in opposition to “the animal,” especially by reserving the notion of subjectivity for humans.  But what happens to the understanding of the human when the very foundations of subjectivity such as  thought, language and moral agency,  are said to be possessed by at least some animals? This course will focus on recent efforts in literature, philosophy and the arts to redress the humanist bias regarding subjectivity and come to grips with the consequences of human animality.

Wesleyan University

American Studies

Megan H. Glick

Bio-ethics and the Animal/Human Boundary

West Chester University

Criminology

Cassandra Reyes

Animals and Crime.  This course is designed to provide intensive examination of the relationship between animal cruelty and the criminal justice system. It will cover the commission of animal cruelty within circumstances such as child abuse, interpersonal violence, and juvenile delinquency. The goal of the course is to offer students an understanding of the impact that animal cruelty has on society and the criminal justice system.

Western Connecticut State University

Philosophy

Kristin Aronson

Ethics and the Nonhuman. Students learn about the treatment of nonhuman animals by humans, and learn how to argue logically and evaluate moral arguments for and against practices and positions. The emphasis is on critical thinking and development of proficiency in arguing the issues.

Williams College

Environmental Studies

William Lynn

Senior Seminar in Environmental Studies. This class is focused on the ethics and meaning of nature-society relations, for example, ‘Conceptions of Nature’ and ‘Ethics and the Environment.’

Wilson College

Religious Studies

David True

Thinking About Animals. This seminar examines prominent interpretations of animals in philosophical, scientific, and religious traditions, in conversation with recent revisionist interpretations.  Central to the seminar is the relationship between animals, human beings, morality, and religious understandings of the divine.  Questions to be considered include: What are the origins of our interpretations of animals?  What, if anything, distinguishes human beings and animals?  How should animals be treated?  Should we continue to ride horses, eat meat, and experiment on animals?