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HAS Executive Committee

The HAS Executive Committee was formed in 2004, and is a group of scholars and other interested parties working to advance Human-Animal Studies. This rapidly growing interdisciplinary academic field examines the complex and multi-dimensional relationships between humans and other animals — be those relationships real or virtual, historical or contemporary, factual or fictional, beneficial or detrimental. The Committee undertakes projects that focus on the institutional development of the field, as distinguished from direct support of research. Goals include the establishment of minors, majors, programs, and centers devoted to the field, and the HAS Fellowship Program. The Committee works under the auspices of the Animals and Society Institute.

The committee is made up of:

Margo DeMello

Margo DeMello

Animals and Society Institute

Margo DeMello has a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology and currently teaches at Canisius College in the anthrozoology Masters program. She also is the President of House Rabbit Society, an international rabbit rescue and education organization. Her books include Stories Rabbits Tell: A Natural and Cultural History of a Misunderstood Creature(2003), Low-Carb Vegetarian (2004), Why Animals Matter: The Case for Animal Protection(2007), Teaching the Animal: Human Animal Studies Across the Disciplines (2010), Animals and Society: An Introduction to Human-Animal Studies (2012), and Speaking for Animals: Animal Autobiographical Writing (2012).

Lori Gruen

Lori Gruen

Wesleyan University

Lori Gruen is Professor and Chair of Philosophy, and Professor of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, and Environmental Studies at Wesleyan University. Her work lies at the intersection of ethical theory and practice, with a particular focus on issues that impact those often overlooked in traditional ethical investigations, e.g. women, people of color, non-human animals.  She has published extensively on topics in ecofeminist ethics, animal ethics, and environmental philosophy.  She is the author of three books on animal ethics, including Entangled Empathy (Lantern, forthcoming) and Ethics and Animals: An Introduction (Cambridge, 2011), the co-editor of five books, including Ecofeminism: Feminist Intersections with Other Animals and the Earth(with Carol Adams, Bloomsbury, 2014), the editor of The Ethics of Captivity (Oxford University Press, 2014), and is the author of dozens of articles and book chapters.

Cheryl Joseph

Cheryl Joseph

Notre Dame de Namur University

Cheryl Joseph is a professor at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont, California, where she combined three of her passions—sociology, teaching, and animals—to create a major in Sociology with a concentration on Animals in Human Society. This four-year undergraduate degree, the only one of its kind in the nation, allows students to study the social aspects of the animal-human bond and to pursue related careers without the traditional biology or veterinary science degrees. Through a university partnership with several local shelters, sanctuaries, and educational centers students in this major are engaged in a two-semester internship which allows them to work directly with animals while mutually assisting people. Inspired by her dog, Ebony, to design this major, the two were co-instructors of the classes for several years. Now Beethoven has taken up his share of the responsibility on Ebony’s behalf.

Susan McHugh

Susan McHugh

University of New England

Susan McHugh is Professor of English at the University of New England, USA. All of her research and some of her teaching focus on literary, visual, and scientific stories of species. McHugh is the author of Animal Stories: Narrating across Species Lines (2011), published in the University of Minnesota Press’s Posthumanities series, as well as Dog (2004), a volume in Reaktion Books’ Animalseries. She has published dozens of essays in peer-reviewed journals and edited collections, and along with Garry Marvin she presently is co-editing The Routledge Handbook of Human-Animal Studies (2013). She serves as Managing Editor of the Humanities for Society & Animals, and is a member of the editorial boards ofAntennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture, AustralAsian Animal Studies Journal, H-Animal Discussion Network, and Humanimalia: A Journal of Human-Animal Interface Studies. McHugh’s ongoing research focuses on the intersections of biological and cultural extinction.

Robert Mitchell

Robert Mitchell

Eastern Kentucky University

Robert Mitchell was raised in New Jersey in the US, where his parents indulgently let him raise hundreds of animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles and mammals) in their home. He has researched cognition in dolphins, apes, dogs, and humans, and has published 6 edited books on animal-related topics including deception, pretense, self-awareness, anthropomorphism, spatial cognition, and ape cognition. He has previously published a monograph on scientific perceptions of apes, and is currently working on two books: one on the history of scientific uses of anthropomorphism to understand animals, and the other on the numerous theories attempting to explain sexual orientation. His most recent areas of interest are the play of sea lions in the Galpagos Islands and the function of people’s laughter when playing with dogs.

Michael Noonan

Michael Noonan

Canisius College

Michael Noonan is Professor of Biology at Canisius College in Buffalo, New York, and Founder and Chair of the Animal Behavior, Ecology and Conservation undergraduate major, as well as Founder and Director of the Anthrozoology Master’s Degree program at Canisius. He also directs the Institute for the Study of Human-Animal Relations and the Canisius Ambassadors for Conservation.

Carrie Rohman

Carrie Rohman

Lafayette College

Carrie Rohman is an Associate Professor of English at Lafayette College in Easton, PA. Before coming to Lafayette, she taught for four years at the University of Pittsburgh, Johnstown. She received her B.A. in English from the University of Dayton, her M.A. in English from Indiana University, and her Ph.D. in 20th-Century British Literature and Critical Theory from Indiana University. Over the course of her career, Professor Rohman has taught courses in British literature, especially the modernist period, the twentieth-century novel, performance studies, science fiction, and writing. She has also taught a variety of animal studies courses examining animals in literature, philosophy, culture, and technology. A number of her animal studies courses have included a service-learning component. Her scholarship has primarily involved examining the question of the animal in 20th-century literature, with an eye toward the philosophical and ethical dimensions of that question. Thus her research interests have been in the areas of animal studies, modernism, posthumanism, and performance. She has published widely on animality in the work of writers such as D. H. Lawrence, Djuna Barnes, Rebecca West, H. G. Wells, and Italo Calvino in journals such as American Literature, Criticism, and Mosaic. Her book, Stalking the Subject: Modernism and the Animal (Columbia, 2009) examines the discourse of animality in modernist literature, taking into account the influences of Darwin and Freud in that period, and recent theoretical work on the species barrier. Her interdisciplinary book, Choreographies of the Living: Bio-aesthetics in Literature, Art, and Performance, is under contract with Oxford University Press.

Andrew Rowan

Andrew Rowan

Humane Society International

Andrew Rowan is president and CEO of Humane Society International, and serves as Chief International Officer and Chief Scientific Officer for The HSUS. He also serves as president of The HSUS Wildlife Land Trust board of directors. Rowan serves on the committees of several animal protection groups, including the World Society for the Protection of Animals, the advisory committee on animal testing for Royal Dutch Shell and the National Institutes of Health ad hoc advisory committee on chimpanzee sanctuaries. He has served in numerous other advisory and consultative roles, including as a member of the advisory committee on alternative methods in toxicology for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and of the National Research Council committee on the use of animals and alternatives in the generation of monoclonal antibodies.

Jeff Sebo

Jeff Sebo

National Institutes of Health

Jeff Sebo holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Sociology from Texas Christian University and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from New York University. He is a Bioethics Fellow at the Department of Bioethics at the National Institutes of Health. He was previously Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow of Animal and Environmental Studies at New York University, where he taught Animal Minds, Ethics and Animals, Political Theory and Animals, and Food, Animals, and the Environment. His research focuses on what it takes to be a moral agent and to have direct moral status. He explores these questions in the case of human beings by arguing that many human beings have multiple personalities, some of which are full moral agents and all of which have direct moral status. And he explores these questions in the case of nonhuman animals by arguing that many nonhuman animals are rational and self-aware in at least a minimal sense, and therefore count as moral agents in at least a minimal sense. Jeff has been a vegan and an animal rights advocate for over ten years now. He founded an animal rights organization as well as a trap-neuter-release program at Texas Christian University, has published work on animal ethics in Animal Liberation Philosophy & Policy, and has presented work on animal ethics at Georgetown University, New York University, Syracuse University, and the University of Texas at Austin. Jeff is thrilled to be able to continue this work now as part of the HAS Executive Committee.

Kenneth Shapiro

Kenneth Shapiro

Animals and Society Institute

Ken Shapiro earned his BA from Harvard University and his PhD in clinical psychology from Duke University. He is cofounder of Animals and Society Institute. He founded Psychologists for the Ethical treatment of Animals and the Society and Animals Forum. He is founder and editor of Society and Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies; cofounder and coeditor of Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science; and editor of the Human-Animal Studies book series. His most recent book is Animal Models of Human Psychology: Critique of Science, Ethics and Policy. He is one of the developers of AniCare and AniCare Child, the only psychological treatment models for animal abusers, and trains therapists throughout the country on the use of these models.

Nik Taylor

Nik Taylor

Flinders University

Nik Taylor received her Ph.D., ‘Human-Animal Relations: A Sociological Respecification’, from Manchester Metropolitan University in 1999. Since then she has researched issues such as links between human and animal directed violence, and humane education and animal assisted therapy. She is currently an Associate Professor in Sociology at Flinders University of South Australia. She has published widely on various aspects of human-animal relations and her books includeTheorizing Animals: Re-Specifying Humanimal Relations (Brill Academic, 2011); Animals, Humans and Society: An Introduction to Human-Animal Studies (Lantern Books, 2013), andAnimals at Work: Identity Politics and Culture in Work with Animals (Brill Academic, 2013). Nik is the Managing Editor (Social Sciences) ofSociety & Animals; a charter scholar of the Animals and Society Institute; a member of the Human Animal Research Group at the University of Adelaide; a participant in the Australian Animals Study group, and an Associate Member of the New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies at the University of Canterbury.