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Advisory Council

Patti Breitman

Patti Breitman

Patti is the founder and director of the Marin Vegetarian Education Group, one of the co-founders of Dharma Voices For Animals, and a former food columnist for VegNews magazine. Patti has been a publishing consultant to many of the vegetarian world’s best known leaders, including Howard Lyman, John Robbins, Dr. Neal Barnard, Ingrid Newkirk, Alan Goldhammer, and Victoria Moran. Her letters to the editors on behalf of animals and plant based eating have been published in dozens of local and national magazines and newspapers.

Donald Cleary

Donald Cleary

Following graduation from the University of San Francisco, Donald Cleary pursued first acting, and then arts administration in the field of classical music. That was followed by contract work as a news spokesman for two political campaigns. In 1977, he brought this variety of experience from San Francisco to New York, and to book publishing. For more than 30 years, he was the Director of Business Affairs for the Jane Rotrosen Agency, which provides literary representation to authors of general interest fiction and non-fiction. When Agency President Jane R. Berkey formed Animal Farm Foundation in 1985, she appointed him Treasurer, a position he still holds. AFF acquired National Canine Research Council in 2007. NCRC’s published mission is “Preserving the human-canine bond.” Representing NCRC, he has spoken at colleges, law schools, animal welfare conferences, and humane agencies, reporting on NCRC’s research into the history of canines in America, government animal control policies, the sociology of knowledge, and the social construction of risk. An amateur historian, for the past several years, he has offered lectures to adult schools on ancient and modern military history, with emphasis on the inutility of war as an instrument of policy in the modern age. He lives in Maplewood, New Jersey with his wife, and two shelter dogs.

John Gluck

John Gluck

John Gluck is an Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of New Mexico and Affiliate Faculty of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University. He trained as a laboratory primatologist and Clinical Psychologist and worked for many years with animal models of abnormal development with a particular interest in the effects of early experience on learning. Following a Fellowship at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and the National Institutes of Health NIH in 1994 where he studied general bioethics, research ethics, and the moral standing of animals, my work has been solely devoted to research ethics – particularly animals. In that capacity he has been the Director of Research Ethics Service Project in the Office of Research at the University of New Mexico (UNM), Co-Director of the UNM Health Science Center Ethics Institute, and as member and chair of two Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, one in an academic context and the other in a private research foundation. At the present time he has become more politically active lobbying congress in favor of the Great Ape Protection Act and other animal welfare issues. His most recent book, authored with Tom Beauchamp, Barbara Orlans, Rebecca Dresser, and David Morton is “The Human Use of Animals: Case Studies in Ethical Choice: published by Oxford University Press in 2008. He is currently working on a book about his ethical development and move away from animal research tentatively titled “Released: the Rediscovery of Ambivalence in the Use of Animals in Research.”

Jack Sawyer

Jack Sawyer

Jack has been a vegan for a dozen years, a vegetarian for forty, and an advocate for social justice even longer. He has been active in the civil rights, peace, feminist, and environmental movements, helped found Psychologists for Social Action, and remain active politically, in both local and national politics. When he was on the faculty at the University of Chicago and then at Northwestern, in psychology and sociology, he did a lot of large scale statistical analyses, including cross-cultural and cross-national research, as well as experimental work. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and of several APA divisions. He is a long time member of the Episcopal Church, has a M.Div from Harvard, and sees relations with other animals as a moral, ethical, spiritual issue. He has an 18 year old dog, his mother’s constant companion for the last seven years of her 99, and his since then.

Eric Greene

Eric Greene

Beginning in the early-1980s, Eric developed and graduated with the first transdisciplinary undergraduate and graduate degrees in animals and culture studies from Binghamton University and Vermont College, respectively, followed by advanced study in cultural anthropology at the New School for Social Research. He taught the first program in animals and culture studies offered at an institution of higher education (Miami-Dade College). Designed to explore the complexities of our relationships with nonhuman animals cross-culturally, this work remains deeply rooted in ideals of social and environmental justice, and attends to the subjectivities of individual animals. Eric has also served as an executive with local and international health-based organizations, where he developed and led programs supporting underserved communities of color. His consulting services,EverGreene Consulting, has advanced a variety of diverse programs from family violence prevention to co-existence and reconciliation in the Middle East to the representation and protection of animals. He is currently in the process of launching Family Spirals, a global think tank and capacity-building nonprofit addressing family identity, cohesion, trauma and joy. Among its four programmatic centers is the Center for Families with Animals, which explores our relationships with other animals within the context of family, and will initially focus on issues of family violence and neglect. The Center also hosts the Green Pet-Burial Society, which promotes environmentally-friendly methods of disposition (e.g., conservation whole-family cemeteries) while advancing research on the perceptions and practices regarding animal death. Eric has served on the Advisory Council since its inception and serves on the editorial board of the journal, Society & Animals.

Judith E. Ciani-Smith

Judith was raised and educated in New England and practiced law for 20 years with the San Francisco firm of Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro specializing in commercial and intellectual property law. She has held numerous positions in local and state bar associations, foundations and non-profits; from 1976-80 she served as a member of the San Francisco Police Commission. Since retiring from law practice in 1995, she has been active in environmental causes and animal rescue. In recent years she has been living half-time in Italy.

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